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harroun

sociabatque

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accipatque

phoenicum

resultative

annos

wifeism

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goneness

kolbo

vivicremation

antemortem

mendelyeevite

skance


Caesar cipher

Caesar cipher, is one of the simplest and most widely known encryption techniques. The transformation can be represented by aligning two alphabets, the cipher alphabet is the plain alphabet rotated left or right by some number of positions.

When encrypting, a person looks up each letter of the message in the 'plain' line and writes down the corresponding letter in the 'cipher' line. Deciphering is done in reverse.
The encryption can also be represented using modular arithmetic by first transforming the letters into numbers, according to the scheme, A = 0, B = 1,..., Z = 25. Encryption of a letter x by a shift n can be described mathematically as

Plaintext: unare
cipher variations:
vobsf wpctg xqduh yrevi zsfwj
atgxk buhyl cvizm dwjan exkbo
fylcp gzmdq haner ibofs jcpgt
kdqhu leriv mfsjw ngtkx ohuly
pivmz qjwna rkxob slypc tmzqd

Decryption is performed similarly,

(There are different definitions for the modulo operation. In the above, the result is in the range 0...25. I.e., if x+n or x-n are not in the range 0...25, we have to subtract or add 26.)
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Atbash Cipher

Atbash is an ancient encryption system created in the Middle East. It was originally used in the Hebrew language.
The Atbash cipher is a simple substitution cipher that relies on transposing all the letters in the alphabet such that the resulting alphabet is backwards.
The first letter is replaced with the last letter, the second with the second-last, and so on.
An example plaintext to ciphertext using Atbash:
Plain: unare
Cipher: fmziv

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Baconian Cipher

To encode a message, each letter of the plaintext is replaced by a group of five of the letters 'A' or 'B'. This replacement is done according to the alphabet of the Baconian cipher, shown below.
a   AAAAA   g    AABBA     m    ABABB   s    BAAAB     y    BABBA
b   AAAAB   h    AABBB     n    ABBAA   t    BAABA     z    BABBB
c   AAABA   i    ABAAA     o    ABBAB   u    BAABB 
d   AAABB   j    BBBAA     p    ABBBA   v    BBBAB
e   AABAA   k    ABAAB     q    ABBBB   w    BABAA
f   AABAB   l    ABABA     r    BAAAA   x    BABAB

Plain: unare
Cipher: BAABB ABBAA AAAAA BAAAA AABAA

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Affine Cipher
In the affine cipher the letters of an alphabet of size m are first mapped to the integers in the range 0..m - 1. It then uses modular arithmetic to transform the integer that each plaintext letter corresponds to into another integer that correspond to a ciphertext letter. The encryption function for a single letter is

where modulus m is the size of the alphabet and a and b are the key of the cipher. The value a must be chosen such that a and m are coprime.
Considering the specific case of encrypting messages in English (i.e. m = 26), there are a total of 286 non-trivial affine ciphers, not counting the 26 trivial Caesar ciphers. This number comes from the fact there are 12 numbers that are coprime with 26 that are less than 26 (these are the possible values of a). Each value of a can have 26 different addition shifts (the b value) ; therefore, there are 12*26 or 312 possible keys.
Plaintext: unare
cipher variations:
vobsfjobanxobivlobqdzobylnobgtpobwjdober
robmzfobuhtobcphobkxwpctgkpcboypcjwmpcre
apczmopchuqpcxkepcfsspcnagpcviupcdqipcly
xqduhlqdcpzqdkxnqdsfbqdanpqdivrqdylfqdgt
tqdobhqdwjvqderjqdmzyrevimredqarelyoretg
creboqrejwsrezmgrehuurepcirexkwrefskrena
zsfwjnsferbsfmzpsfuhdsfcprsfkxtsfanhsfiv
vsfqdjsfylxsfgtlsfobatgxkotgfsctgnaqtgvi
etgdqstglyutgboitgjwwtgrektgzmytghumtgpc
buhylpuhgtduhobruhwjfuhertuhmzvuhcpjuhkx
xuhsfluhanzuhivnuhqdcvizmqvihuevipcsvixk
gvifsuvinawvidqkvilyyvitgmviboavijwovire
dwjanrwjivfwjqdtwjylhwjgtvwjobxwjerlwjmz
zwjuhnwjcpbwjkxpwjsfexkbosxkjwgxkreuxkzm
ixkhuwxkpcyxkfsmxknaaxkvioxkdqcxklyqxktg
fylcptylkxhylsfvylanjylivxylqdzylgtnylob
bylwjpylerdylmzryluhgzmdquzmlyizmtgwzmbo
kzmjwyzmreazmhuozmpcczmxkqzmfsezmnaszmvi
hanervanmzjanuhxancplankxzansfbanivpanqd
danylrangtfanobtanwjibofswbonakboviybodq
mbolyabotgcbojwqboreebozmsbohugbopcuboxk
jcpgtxcpoblcpwjzcperncpmzbcpuhdcpkxrcpsf
fcpantcpivhcpqdvcpylkdqhuydqpcmdqxkadqfs
odqnacdqviedqlysdqtggdqboudqjwidqrewdqzm
lerivzerqdnerylbergtperobderwjfermzteruh
hercpverkxjersfxeranmfsjwafsreofszmcfshu
qfspcefsxkgfsnaufsviifsdqwfslykfstgyfsbo
ngtkxbgtsfpgtandgtivrgtqdfgtylhgtobvgtwj
jgterxgtmzlgtuhzgtcpohulychutgqhuboehujw
shureghuzmihupcwhuxkkhufsyhunamhuviahudq
pivmzdivuhrivcpfivkxtivsfhivanjivqdxivyl
livgtzivobnivwjbiverqjwnaejwvisjwdqgjwly
ujwtgijwbokjwreyjwzmmjwhuajwpcojwxkcjwfs
rkxobfkxwjtkxerhkxmzvkxuhjkxcplkxsfzkxan
nkxivbkxqdpkxyldkxgtslypcglyxkulyfsilyna
wlyviklydqmlytgalyboolyjwclyreqlyzmelyhu
tmzqdhmzylvmzgtjmzobxmzwjlmzernmzuhbmzcp
pmzkxdmzsfrmzanfmzivunareinazmwnahuknapc
ynaxkmnafsonavicnadqqnalyenatgsnabognajw

The decryption function is

where a - 1 is the modular multiplicative inverse of a modulo m. I.e., it satisfies the equation

The multiplicative inverse of a only exists if a and m are coprime. Hence without the restriction on a decryption might not be possible. It can be shown as follows that decryption function is the inverse of the encryption function,

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ROT13 Cipher
Applying ROT13 to a piece of text merely requires examining its alphabetic characters and replacing each one by the letter 13 places further along in the alphabet, wrapping back to the beginning if necessary. A becomes N, B becomes O, and so on up to M, which becomes Z, then the sequence continues at the beginning of the alphabet: N becomes A, O becomes B, and so on to Z, which becomes M. Only those letters which occur in the English alphabet are affected; numbers, symbols, whitespace, and all other characters are left unchanged. Because there are 26 letters in the English alphabet and 26 = 2 * 13, the ROT13 function is its own inverse:

ROT13(ROT13(x)) = x for any basic Latin-alphabet text x


An example plaintext to ciphertext using ROT13:

Plain: unare
Cipher: haner

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Polybius Square

A Polybius Square is a table that allows someone to translate letters into numbers. To give a small level of encryption, this table can be randomized and shared with the recipient. In order to fit the 26 letters of the alphabet into the 25 spots created by the table, the letters i and j are usually combined.
1 2 3 4 5
1 A B C D E
2 F G H I/J K
3 L M N O P
4 Q R S T U
5 V W X Y Z

Basic Form:
Plain: unare
Cipher: 5433112451

Extended Methods:
Method #1

Plaintext: unare
method variations:
zsfwkexlbpkcqguphvmz

Method #2
Bifid cipher
The message is converted to its coordinates in the usual manner, but they are written vertically beneath:
u n a r e 
5 3 1 2 5 
4 3 1 4 1 
They are then read out in rows:
5312543141
Then divided up into pairs again, and the pairs turned back into letters using the square:
Plain: unare
Cipher: pfucd

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Method #3

Plaintext: unare
method variations:
ocfyv cfyvo fyvoc
yvocf vocfy

Read more ...[RUS] , [EN]

 

Permutation Cipher
In classical cryptography, a permutation cipher is a transposition cipher in which the key is a permutation. To apply a cipher, a random permutation of size E is generated (the larger the value of E the more secure the cipher). The plaintext is then broken into segments of size E and the letters within that segment are permuted according to this key.
In theory, any transposition cipher can be viewed as a permutation cipher where E is equal to the length of the plaintext; this is too cumbersome a generalisation to use in actual practice, however.
The idea behind a permutation cipher is to keep the plaintext characters unchanged, butalter their positions by rearrangement using a permutation
This cipher is defined as:
Let m be a positive integer, and K consist of all permutations of {1,...,m}
For a key (permutation) , define:
The encryption function
The decryption function
A small example, assuming m = 6, and the key is the permutation :

The first row is the value of i, and the second row is the corresponding value of (i)
The inverse permutation, is constructed by interchanging the two rows, andrearranging the columns so that the first row is in increasing order, Therefore, is:

Total variation formula:

e = 2,718281828 , n - plaintext length

Plaintext: unare

all 120 cipher variations:
unare unaer unrae unrea unera unear uanre uaner uarne uaren uaern
uaenr urane uraen urnae urnea urena urean uearn ueanr ueran uerna
uenra uenar nuare nuaer nurae nurea nuera nuear naure nauer narue
nareu naeru naeur nraue nraeu nruae nruea nreua nreau nearu neaur
nerau nerua neura neuar anure anuer anrue anreu aneru aneur aunre
auner aurne auren auern auenr arune aruen arnue arneu arenu areun
aeurn aeunr aerun aernu aenru aenur rnaue rnaeu rnuae rnuea rneua
rneau ranue raneu raune rauen raeun raenu ruane ruaen runae runea
ruena ruean reaun reanu reuan reuna renua renau enaru enaur enrau
enrua enura enuar eanru eanur earnu earun eaurn eaunr eranu eraun
ernau ernua eruna eruan euarn euanr euran eurna eunra eunar

Read more ...[1] , [2] , [3]

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