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submissible

meissa

smutproof

carbinolicum

asteatosis

untransfusible

putaveramus

tumulusque

ishpingo

intertangles

undraping

unableness

hyperinosis

gotts

pandunturque

interreticulation

interjangle

arcocellulus


Caesar cipher

Caesar cipher, is one of the simplest and most widely known encryption techniques. The transformation can be represented by aligning two alphabets, the cipher alphabet is the plain alphabet rotated left or right by some number of positions.

When encrypting, a person looks up each letter of the message in the 'plain' line and writes down the corresponding letter in the 'cipher' line. Deciphering is done in reverse.
The encryption can also be represented using modular arithmetic by first transforming the letters into numbers, according to the scheme, A = 0, B = 1,..., Z = 25. Encryption of a letter x by a shift n can be described mathematically as

Plaintext: spade
cipher variations:
tqbef urcfg vsdgh wtehi xufij
yvgjk zwhkl axilm byjmn czkno
dalop ebmpq fcnqr gdors hepst
ifqtu jgruv khsvw litwx mjuxy
nkvyz olwza pmxab qnybc rozcd

Decryption is performed similarly,

(There are different definitions for the modulo operation. In the above, the result is in the range 0...25. I.e., if x+n or x-n are not in the range 0...25, we have to subtract or add 26.)
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Atbash Cipher

Atbash is an ancient encryption system created in the Middle East. It was originally used in the Hebrew language.
The Atbash cipher is a simple substitution cipher that relies on transposing all the letters in the alphabet such that the resulting alphabet is backwards.
The first letter is replaced with the last letter, the second with the second-last, and so on.
An example plaintext to ciphertext using Atbash:
Plain: spade
Cipher: hkzwv

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Baconian Cipher

To encode a message, each letter of the plaintext is replaced by a group of five of the letters 'A' or 'B'. This replacement is done according to the alphabet of the Baconian cipher, shown below.
a   AAAAA   g    AABBA     m    ABABB   s    BAAAB     y    BABBA
b   AAAAB   h    AABBB     n    ABBAA   t    BAABA     z    BABBB
c   AAABA   i    ABAAA     o    ABBAB   u    BAABB 
d   AAABB   j    BBBAA     p    ABBBA   v    BBBAB
e   AABAA   k    ABAAB     q    ABBBB   w    BABAA
f   AABAB   l    ABABA     r    BAAAA   x    BABAB

Plain: spade
Cipher: BAAAB ABBBA AAAAA AAABB AABAA

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Affine Cipher
In the affine cipher the letters of an alphabet of size m are first mapped to the integers in the range 0..m - 1. It then uses modular arithmetic to transform the integer that each plaintext letter corresponds to into another integer that correspond to a ciphertext letter. The encryption function for a single letter is

where modulus m is the size of the alphabet and a and b are the key of the cipher. The value a must be chosen such that a and m are coprime.
Considering the specific case of encrypting messages in English (i.e. m = 26), there are a total of 286 non-trivial affine ciphers, not counting the 26 trivial Caesar ciphers. This number comes from the fact there are 12 numbers that are coprime with 26 that are less than 26 (these are the possible values of a). Each value of a can have 26 different addition shifts (the b value) ; therefore, there are 12*26 or 312 possible keys.
Plaintext: spade
cipher variations:
tqbefdubknnybqvxcbwdhgbclrkbitlsbujvwbar
fabgzpebmhzibspjmbyxurcfgevcloozcrwydcxe
ihcdmslcjumtcvkwxcbsgbchaqfcniajctqknczy
vsdghfwdmppadsxzedyfjidentmdkvnudwlxydct
hcdibrgdojbkdurlodazwtehigxenqqbetyafezg
kjefounelwovexmyzeduidejcshepkclevsmpeba
xufijhyforrcfuzbgfahlkfgpvofmxpwfynzafev
jefkdtifqldmfwtnqfcbyvgjkizgpssdgvachgbi
mlghqwpgnyqxgzoabgfwkfgleujgrmengxuorgdc
zwhkljahqttehwbdihcjnmhirxqhozryhapbchgx
lghmfvkhsnfohyvpshedaxilmkbiruufixcejidk
onijsyripaszibqcdihymhingwlitogpizwqtife
byjmnlcjsvvgjydfkjelpojktzsjqbtajcrdejiz
nijohxmjuphqjaxrujgfczknomdktwwhkzeglkfm
qpkluatkrcubkdsefkjaojkpiynkvqirkbysvkhg
dalopneluxxilafhmlgnrqlmvbulsdvcletfglkb
pklqjzolwrjslcztwlihebmpqofmvyyjmbginmho
srmnwcvmtewdmfughmlcqlmrkapmxsktmdauxmji
fcnqrpgnwzzknchjoniptsnoxdwnufxengvhinmd
rmnslbqnytlunebvynkjgdorsqhoxaalodikpojq
utopyexovgyfohwijonesnotmcrozumvofcwzolk
hepstripybbmpejlqpkrvupqzfypwhzgpixjkpof
topundspavnwpgdxapmlifqtusjqzccnqfkmrqls
wvqragzqxiahqjyklqpgupqvoetqbwoxqheybqnm
jgruvtkraddorglnsrmtxwrsbharyjbirkzlmrqh
vqrwpfurcxpyrifzcronkhsvwulsbeepshmotsnu
yxstcibszkcjslamnsriwrsxqgvsdyqzsjgadspo
litwxvmtcffqtinputovzytudjctaldktmbnotsj
xstyrhwtezratkhbetqpmjuxywnudggrujoqvupw
azuvekdubmeluncoputkytuzsixufasbulicfurq
nkvyzxovehhsvkprwvqxbavwflevcnfmvodpqvul
zuvatjyvgbtcvmjdgvsrolwzaypwfiitwlqsxwry
cbwxgmfwdognwpeqrwvmavwbukzwhcudwnkehwts
pmxabzqxgjjuxmrtyxszdcxyhngxephoxqfrsxwn
bwxcvlaxidvexolfixutqnybcaryhkkvynsuzyta
edyziohyfqipyrgstyxocxydwmbyjewfypmgjyvu
rozcdbszillwzotvazubfezajpizgrjqzshtuzyp
dyzexnczkfxgzqnhkzwvspadectajmmxapuwbavc
gfabkqjahskratiuvazqezafyodalgyharoilaxw

The decryption function is

where a - 1 is the modular multiplicative inverse of a modulo m. I.e., it satisfies the equation

The multiplicative inverse of a only exists if a and m are coprime. Hence without the restriction on a decryption might not be possible. It can be shown as follows that decryption function is the inverse of the encryption function,

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ROT13 Cipher
Applying ROT13 to a piece of text merely requires examining its alphabetic characters and replacing each one by the letter 13 places further along in the alphabet, wrapping back to the beginning if necessary. A becomes N, B becomes O, and so on up to M, which becomes Z, then the sequence continues at the beginning of the alphabet: N becomes A, O becomes B, and so on to Z, which becomes M. Only those letters which occur in the English alphabet are affected; numbers, symbols, whitespace, and all other characters are left unchanged. Because there are 26 letters in the English alphabet and 26 = 2 * 13, the ROT13 function is its own inverse:

ROT13(ROT13(x)) = x for any basic Latin-alphabet text x


An example plaintext to ciphertext using ROT13:

Plain: spade
Cipher: fcnqr

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Polybius Square

A Polybius Square is a table that allows someone to translate letters into numbers. To give a small level of encryption, this table can be randomized and shared with the recipient. In order to fit the 26 letters of the alphabet into the 25 spots created by the table, the letters i and j are usually combined.
1 2 3 4 5
1 A B C D E
2 F G H I/J K
3 L M N O P
4 Q R S T U
5 V W X Y Z

Basic Form:
Plain: spade
Cipher: 3453114151

Extended Methods:
Method #1

Plaintext: spade
method variations:
xufikczlopheqtunkvyz

Method #2
Bifid cipher
The message is converted to its coordinates in the usual manner, but they are written vertically beneath:
s p a d e 
3 5 1 4 5 
4 3 1 1 1 
They are then read out in rows:
3514543111
Then divided up into pairs again, and the pairs turned back into letters using the square:
Plain: spade
Cipher: xquca

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Method #3

Plaintext: spade
method variations:
ycqvl cqvly qvlyc
vlycq lycqv

Read more ...[RUS] , [EN]

 

Permutation Cipher
In classical cryptography, a permutation cipher is a transposition cipher in which the key is a permutation. To apply a cipher, a random permutation of size E is generated (the larger the value of E the more secure the cipher). The plaintext is then broken into segments of size E and the letters within that segment are permuted according to this key.
In theory, any transposition cipher can be viewed as a permutation cipher where E is equal to the length of the plaintext; this is too cumbersome a generalisation to use in actual practice, however.
The idea behind a permutation cipher is to keep the plaintext characters unchanged, butalter their positions by rearrangement using a permutation
This cipher is defined as:
Let m be a positive integer, and K consist of all permutations of {1,...,m}
For a key (permutation) , define:
The encryption function
The decryption function
A small example, assuming m = 6, and the key is the permutation :

The first row is the value of i, and the second row is the corresponding value of (i)
The inverse permutation, is constructed by interchanging the two rows, andrearranging the columns so that the first row is in increasing order, Therefore, is:

Total variation formula:

e = 2,718281828 , n - plaintext length

Plaintext: spade

all 120 cipher variations:
spade spaed spdae spdea speda spead sapde saped sadpe sadep saedp
saepd sdape sdaep sdpae sdpea sdepa sdeap seadp seapd sedap sedpa
sepda sepad psade psaed psdae psdea pseda psead pasde pased padse
pades paeds paesd pdase pdaes pdsae pdsea pdesa pdeas peads peasd
pedas pedsa pesda pesad apsde apsed apdse apdes apeds apesd aspde
asped asdpe asdep asedp asepd adspe adsep adpse adpes adeps adesp
aesdp aespd aedsp aedps aepds aepsd dpase dpaes dpsae dpsea dpesa
dpeas dapse dapes daspe dasep daesp daeps dsape dsaep dspae dspea
dsepa dseap deasp deaps desap despa depsa depas epads epasd epdas
epdsa epsda epsad eapds eapsd eadps eadsp easdp easpd edaps edasp
edpas edpsa edspa edsap esadp esapd esdap esdpa espda espad

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