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Caesar cipher

Caesar cipher, is one of the simplest and most widely known encryption techniques. The transformation can be represented by aligning two alphabets, the cipher alphabet is the plain alphabet rotated left or right by some number of positions.

When encrypting, a person looks up each letter of the message in the 'plain' line and writes down the corresponding letter in the 'cipher' line. Deciphering is done in reverse.
The encryption can also be represented using modular arithmetic by first transforming the letters into numbers, according to the scheme, A = 0, B = 1,..., Z = 25. Encryption of a letter x by a shift n can be described mathematically as

Plaintext: scrams
cipher variations:
tdsbnt uetcou vfudpv wgveqw xhwfrx
yixgsy zjyhtz akziua blajvb cmbkwc
dnclxd eodmye fpenzf gqfoag hrgpbh
ishqci jtirdj kujsek lvktfl mwlugm
nxmvhn oynwio pzoxjp qapykq rbqzlr

Decryption is performed similarly,

(There are different definitions for the modulo operation. In the above, the result is in the range 0...25. I.e., if x+n or x-n are not in the range 0...25, we have to subtract or add 26.)
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Atbash Cipher

Atbash is an ancient encryption system created in the Middle East. It was originally used in the Hebrew language.
The Atbash cipher is a simple substitution cipher that relies on transposing all the letters in the alphabet such that the resulting alphabet is backwards.
The first letter is replaced with the last letter, the second with the second-last, and so on.
An example plaintext to ciphertext using Atbash:
Plain: scrams
Cipher: hxiznh

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Baconian Cipher

To encode a message, each letter of the plaintext is replaced by a group of five of the letters 'A' or 'B'. This replacement is done according to the alphabet of the Baconian cipher, shown below.
a   AAAAA   g    AABBA     m    ABABB   s    BAAAB     y    BABBA
b   AAAAB   h    AABBB     n    ABBAA   t    BAABA     z    BABBB
c   AAABA   i    ABAAA     o    ABBAB   u    BAABB 
d   AAABB   j    BBBAA     p    ABBBA   v    BBBAB
e   AABAA   k    ABAAB     q    ABBBB   w    BABAA
f   AABAB   l    ABABA     r    BAAAA   x    BABAB

Plain: scrams
Cipher: BAAAB AAABA BAAAA AAAAA ABABB BAAAB

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Affine Cipher
In the affine cipher the letters of an alphabet of size m are first mapped to the integers in the range 0..m - 1. It then uses modular arithmetic to transform the integer that each plaintext letter corresponds to into another integer that correspond to a ciphertext letter. The encryption function for a single letter is

where modulus m is the size of the alphabet and a and b are the key of the cipher. The value a must be chosen such that a and m are coprime.
Considering the specific case of encrypting messages in English (i.e. m = 26), there are a total of 286 non-trivial affine ciphers, not counting the 26 trivial Caesar ciphers. This number comes from the fact there are 12 numbers that are coprime with 26 that are less than 26 (these are the possible values of a). Each value of a can have 26 different addition shifts (the b value) ; therefore, there are 12*26 or 312 possible keys.
Plaintext: scrams
cipher variations:
tdsbntdhabldnlibjnxpqbhxhtybfhrxgbdrlfwbzlvjebxv
fnmbvfprubtpzvcbrzjzkbpjuetcoueibcmeomjckoyqrciy
iuzcgisyhcesmgxcamwkfcywgoncwgqsvcuqawdcsakalcqk
vfudpvfjcdnfpnkdlpzrsdjzjvadhjtzidftnhydbnxlgdzx
hpodxhrtwdvrbxedtblbmdrlwgveqwgkdeogqolemqasteka
kwbeikuajeguoizecoymheayiqpeyisuxewscyfeucmcnesm
xhwfrxhlefphrpmfnrbtuflblxcfjlvbkfhvpjafdpznifbz
jrqfzjtvyfxtdzgfvdndoftnyixgsyimfgqisqngoscuvgmc
mydgkmwclgiwqkbgeqaojgcaksrgakuwzgyueahgweoepguo
zjyhtzjnghrjtrohptdvwhndnzehlnxdmhjxrlchfrbpkhdb
ltshblvxahzvfbihxfpfqhvpakziuakohiskuspiquewxioe
oafimoyenikysmdigscqliecmuticmwybiawgcjiygqgriwq
blajvblpijtlvtqjrvfxyjpfpbgjnpzfojlztnejhtdrmjfd
nvujdnxzcjbxhdkjzhrhsjxrcmbkwcmqjkumwurkswgyzkqg
qchkoqagpkmauofkiuesnkgeowvkeoyadkcyielkaisitkys
dnclxdnrklvnxvsltxhzalrhrdilprbhqlnbvpgljvftolhf
pxwlfpzbeldzjfmlbjtjulzteodmyeoslmwoywtmuyiabmsi
sejmqscirmocwqhmkwgupmigqyxmgqacfmeakgnmckukvmau
fpenzfptmnxpzxunvzjbcntjtfknrtdjsnpdxrinlxhvqnjh
rzynhrbdgnfblhondlvlwnbvgqfoagqunoyqayvowakcdouk
uglosuektoqeysjomyiwrokisazoiscehogcmipoemwmxocw
hrgpbhrvopzrbzwpxbldepvlvhmptvfluprfztkpnzjxsplj
tbapjtdfiphdnjqpfnxnypdxishqciswpqascaxqycmefqwm
winquwgmvqsgaulqoakytqmkucbqkuegjqieokrqgoyozqey
jtirdjtxqrbtdbyrzdnfgrxnxjorvxhnwrthbvmrpblzurnl
vdcrlvfhkrjfplsrhpzparfzkujsekuyrscueczsaeoghsyo
ykpswyioxsuicwnsqcmavsomwedsmwgilskgqmtsiqaqbsga
lvktflvzstdvfdatbfphitzpzlqtxzjpytvjdxotrdnbwtpn
xfetnxhjmtlhrnutjrbrcthbmwlugmwatuewgebucgqijuaq
amruyakqzuwkeypuseocxuqoygfuoyiknumisovukscsduic
nxmvhnxbuvfxhfcvdhrjkvbrbnsvzblravxlfzqvtfpdyvrp
zhgvpzjlovnjtpwvltdtevjdoynwioycvwgyigdweisklwcs
cotwacmsbwymgarwugqezwsqaihwqakmpwokuqxwmueufwke
pzoxjpzdwxhzjhexfjtlmxdtdpuxbdntcxznhbsxvhrfaxtr
bjixrblnqxplvryxnvfvgxlfqapykqaexyiakifygkumnyeu
eqvyceoudyaoictywisgbyusckjyscmoryqmwszyowgwhymg
rbqzlrbfyzjbljgzhlvnozfvfrwzdfpvezbpjduzxjthczvt
dlkztdnpszrnxtazpxhxiznhscramscgzakcmkhaimwopagw
gsxaegqwfacqkevaykuidawuemlaueoqtasoyubaqyiyjaoi

The decryption function is

where a - 1 is the modular multiplicative inverse of a modulo m. I.e., it satisfies the equation

The multiplicative inverse of a only exists if a and m are coprime. Hence without the restriction on a decryption might not be possible. It can be shown as follows that decryption function is the inverse of the encryption function,

Read more ...

 

ROT13 Cipher
Applying ROT13 to a piece of text merely requires examining its alphabetic characters and replacing each one by the letter 13 places further along in the alphabet, wrapping back to the beginning if necessary. A becomes N, B becomes O, and so on up to M, which becomes Z, then the sequence continues at the beginning of the alphabet: N becomes A, O becomes B, and so on to Z, which becomes M. Only those letters which occur in the English alphabet are affected; numbers, symbols, whitespace, and all other characters are left unchanged. Because there are 26 letters in the English alphabet and 26 = 2 * 13, the ROT13 function is its own inverse:

ROT13(ROT13(x)) = x for any basic Latin-alphabet text x


An example plaintext to ciphertext using ROT13:

Plain: scrams
Cipher: fpenzf

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Polybius Square

A Polybius Square is a table that allows someone to translate letters into numbers. To give a small level of encryption, this table can be randomized and shared with the recipient. In order to fit the 26 letters of the alphabet into the 25 spots created by the table, the letters i and j are usually combined.
1 2 3 4 5
1 A B C D E
2 F G H I/J K
3 L M N O P
4 Q R S T U
5 V W X Y Z

Basic Form:
Plain: scrams
Cipher: 343124112334

Extended Methods:
Method #1

Plaintext: scrams
method variations:
xhwfrxcnblwchsgqbhnxmvgn

Method #2
Bifid cipher
The message is converted to its coordinates in the usual manner, but they are written vertically beneath:
s c r a m s 
3 3 2 1 2 3 
4 1 4 1 3 4 
They are then read out in rows:
332123414134
Then divided up into pairs again, and the pairs turned back into letters using the square:
Plain: scrams
Cipher: nbmdds

Read more ...
Method #3

Plaintext: scrams
method variations:
ofdfno fdfnoo dfnoof
fnoofd noofdf oofdfn

Read more ...[RUS] , [EN]

 

Permutation Cipher
In classical cryptography, a permutation cipher is a transposition cipher in which the key is a permutation. To apply a cipher, a random permutation of size E is generated (the larger the value of E the more secure the cipher). The plaintext is then broken into segments of size E and the letters within that segment are permuted according to this key.
In theory, any transposition cipher can be viewed as a permutation cipher where E is equal to the length of the plaintext; this is too cumbersome a generalisation to use in actual practice, however.
The idea behind a permutation cipher is to keep the plaintext characters unchanged, butalter their positions by rearrangement using a permutation
This cipher is defined as:
Let m be a positive integer, and K consist of all permutations of {1,...,m}
For a key (permutation) , define:
The encryption function
The decryption function
A small example, assuming m = 6, and the key is the permutation :

The first row is the value of i, and the second row is the corresponding value of (i)
The inverse permutation, is constructed by interchanging the two rows, andrearranging the columns so that the first row is in increasing order, Therefore, is:

Total variation formula:

e = 2,718281828 , n - plaintext length

Plaintext: scrams

all 720 cipher variations:
scrams scrasm scrmas scrmsa scrsma scrsam scarms scarsm scamrs scamsr scasmr
scasrm scmars scmasr scmras scmrsa scmsra scmsar scsamr scsarm scsmar scsmra
scsrma scsram srcams srcasm srcmas srcmsa srcsma srcsam sracms sracsm sramcs
sramsc srasmc srascm srmacs srmasc srmcas srmcsa srmsca srmsac srsamc srsacm
srsmac srsmca srscma srscam sarcms sarcsm sarmcs sarmsc sarsmc sarscm sacrms
sacrsm sacmrs sacmsr sacsmr sacsrm samcrs samcsr samrcs samrsc samsrc samscr
sascmr sascrm sasmcr sasmrc sasrmc sasrcm smracs smrasc smrcas smrcsa smrsca
smrsac smarcs smarsc smacrs smacsr smascr smasrc smcars smcasr smcras smcrsa
smcsra smcsar smsacr smsarc smscar smscra smsrca smsrac ssramc ssracm ssrmac
ssrmca ssrcma ssrcam ssarmc ssarcm ssamrc ssamcr ssacmr ssacrm ssmarc ssmacr
ssmrac ssmrca ssmcra ssmcar sscamr sscarm sscmar sscmra sscrma sscram csrams
csrasm csrmas csrmsa csrsma csrsam csarms csarsm csamrs csamsr csasmr csasrm
csmars csmasr csmras csmrsa csmsra csmsar cssamr cssarm cssmar cssmra cssrma
cssram crsams crsasm crsmas crsmsa crssma crssam crasms crassm cramss cramss
crasms crassm crmass crmass crmsas crmssa crmssa crmsas crsams crsasm crsmas
crsmsa crssma crssam carsms carssm carmss carmss carsms carssm casrms casrsm
casmrs casmsr cassmr cassrm camsrs camssr camrss camrss camsrs camssr cassmr
cassrm casmsr casmrs casrms casrsm cmrass cmrass cmrsas cmrssa cmrssa cmrsas
cmarss cmarss cmasrs cmassr cmassr cmasrs cmsars cmsasr cmsras cmsrsa cmssra
cmssar cmsasr cmsars cmssar cmssra cmsrsa cmsras csrams csrasm csrmas csrmsa
csrsma csrsam csarms csarsm csamrs csamsr csasmr csasrm csmars csmasr csmras
csmrsa csmsra csmsar cssamr cssarm cssmar cssmra cssrma cssram rcsams rcsasm
rcsmas rcsmsa rcssma rcssam rcasms rcassm rcamss rcamss rcasms rcassm rcmass
rcmass rcmsas rcmssa rcmssa rcmsas rcsams rcsasm rcsmas rcsmsa rcssma rcssam
rscams rscasm rscmas rscmsa rscsma rscsam rsacms rsacsm rsamcs rsamsc rsasmc
rsascm rsmacs rsmasc rsmcas rsmcsa rsmsca rsmsac rssamc rssacm rssmac rssmca
rsscma rsscam rascms rascsm rasmcs rasmsc rassmc rasscm racsms racssm racmss
racmss racsms racssm ramcss ramcss ramscs ramssc ramssc ramscs rascms rascsm
rasmcs rasmsc rassmc rasscm rmsacs rmsasc rmscas rmscsa rmssca rmssac rmascs
rmassc rmacss rmacss rmascs rmassc rmcass rmcass rmcsas rmcssa rmcssa rmcsas
rmsacs rmsasc rmscas rmscsa rmssca rmssac rssamc rssacm rssmac rssmca rsscma
rsscam rsasmc rsascm rsamsc rsamcs rsacms rsacsm rsmasc rsmacs rsmsac rsmsca
rsmcsa rsmcas rscams rscasm rscmas rscmsa rscsma rscsam acrsms acrssm acrmss
acrmss acrsms acrssm acsrms acsrsm acsmrs acsmsr acssmr acssrm acmsrs acmssr
acmrss acmrss acmsrs acmssr acssmr acssrm acsmsr acsmrs acsrms acsrsm arcsms
arcssm arcmss arcmss arcsms arcssm arscms arscsm arsmcs arsmsc arssmc arsscm
armscs armssc armcss armcss armscs armssc arssmc arsscm arsmsc arsmcs arscms
arscsm asrcms asrcsm asrmcs asrmsc asrsmc asrscm ascrms ascrsm ascmrs ascmsr
ascsmr ascsrm asmcrs asmcsr asmrcs asmrsc asmsrc asmscr asscmr asscrm assmcr
assmrc assrmc assrcm amrscs amrssc amrcss amrcss amrscs amrssc amsrcs amsrsc
amscrs amscsr amsscr amssrc amcsrs amcssr amcrss amcrss amcsrs amcssr amsscr
amssrc amscsr amscrs amsrcs amsrsc asrsmc asrscm asrmsc asrmcs asrcms asrcsm
assrmc assrcm assmrc assmcr asscmr asscrm asmsrc asmscr asmrsc asmrcs asmcrs
asmcsr ascsmr ascsrm ascmsr ascmrs ascrms ascrsm mcrass mcrass mcrsas mcrssa
mcrssa mcrsas mcarss mcarss mcasrs mcassr mcassr mcasrs mcsars mcsasr mcsras
mcsrsa mcssra mcssar mcsasr mcsars mcssar mcssra mcsrsa mcsras mrcass mrcass
mrcsas mrcssa mrcssa mrcsas mracss mracss mrascs mrassc mrassc mrascs mrsacs
mrsasc mrscas mrscsa mrssca mrssac mrsasc mrsacs mrssac mrssca mrscsa mrscas
marcss marcss marscs marssc marssc marscs macrss macrss macsrs macssr macssr
macsrs mascrs mascsr masrcs masrsc massrc masscr mascsr mascrs masscr massrc
masrsc masrcs msracs msrasc msrcas msrcsa msrsca msrsac msarcs msarsc msacrs
msacsr msascr msasrc mscars mscasr mscras mscrsa mscsra mscsar mssacr mssarc
msscar msscra mssrca mssrac msrasc msracs msrsac msrsca msrcsa msrcas msarsc
msarcs msasrc msascr msacsr msacrs mssarc mssacr mssrac mssrca msscra msscar
mscasr mscars mscsar mscsra mscrsa mscras scrams scrasm scrmas scrmsa scrsma
scrsam scarms scarsm scamrs scamsr scasmr scasrm scmars scmasr scmras scmrsa
scmsra scmsar scsamr scsarm scsmar scsmra scsrma scsram srcams srcasm srcmas
srcmsa srcsma srcsam sracms sracsm sramcs sramsc srasmc srascm srmacs srmasc
srmcas srmcsa srmsca srmsac srsamc srsacm srsmac srsmca srscma srscam sarcms
sarcsm sarmcs sarmsc sarsmc sarscm sacrms sacrsm sacmrs sacmsr sacsmr sacsrm
samcrs samcsr samrcs samrsc samsrc samscr sascmr sascrm sasmcr sasmrc sasrmc
sasrcm smracs smrasc smrcas smrcsa smrsca smrsac smarcs smarsc smacrs smacsr
smascr smasrc smcars smcasr smcras smcrsa smcsra smcsar smsacr smsarc smscar
smscra smsrca smsrac ssramc ssracm ssrmac ssrmca ssrcma ssrcam ssarmc ssarcm
ssamrc ssamcr ssacmr ssacrm ssmarc ssmacr ssmrac ssmrca ssmcra ssmcar sscamr
sscarm sscmar sscmra sscrma sscram

Read more ...[1] , [2] , [3]

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