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fustukian

coprosterol

acquaintancy

telemechanics

proofer

iridectomies

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mutaveritque

alusa

orthodiagonal

blocs

consistasque

macmiller

mesethmoid


Caesar cipher

Caesar cipher, is one of the simplest and most widely known encryption techniques. The transformation can be represented by aligning two alphabets, the cipher alphabet is the plain alphabet rotated left or right by some number of positions.

When encrypting, a person looks up each letter of the message in the 'plain' line and writes down the corresponding letter in the 'cipher' line. Deciphering is done in reverse.
The encryption can also be represented using modular arithmetic by first transforming the letters into numbers, according to the scheme, A = 0, B = 1,..., Z = 25. Encryption of a letter x by a shift n can be described mathematically as

Plaintext: paulb
cipher variations:
qbvmc rcwnd sdxoe teypf ufzqg
vgarh whbsi xictj yjduk zkevl
alfwm bmgxn cnhyo doizp epjaq
fqkbr grlcs hsmdt itneu juofv
kvpgw lwqhx mxriy nysjz oztka

Decryption is performed similarly,

(There are different definitions for the modulo operation. In the above, the result is in the range 0...25. I.e., if x+n or x-n are not in the range 0...25, we have to subtract or add 26.)
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Atbash Cipher

Atbash is an ancient encryption system created in the Middle East. It was originally used in the Hebrew language.
The Atbash cipher is a simple substitution cipher that relies on transposing all the letters in the alphabet such that the resulting alphabet is backwards.
The first letter is replaced with the last letter, the second with the second-last, and so on.
An example plaintext to ciphertext using Atbash:
Plain: paulb
Cipher: kzfoy

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Baconian Cipher

To encode a message, each letter of the plaintext is replaced by a group of five of the letters 'A' or 'B'. This replacement is done according to the alphabet of the Baconian cipher, shown below.
a   AAAAA   g    AABBA     m    ABABB   s    BAAAB     y    BABBA
b   AAAAB   h    AABBB     n    ABBAA   t    BAABA     z    BABBB
c   AAABA   i    ABAAA     o    ABBAB   u    BAABB 
d   AAABB   j    BBBAA     p    ABBBA   v    BBBAB
e   AABAA   k    ABAAB     q    ABBBB   w    BABAA
f   AABAB   l    ABABA     r    BAAAA   x    BABAB

Plain: paulb
Cipher: ABBBA AAAAA BAABB ABABA AAAAB

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Affine Cipher
In the affine cipher the letters of an alphabet of size m are first mapped to the integers in the range 0..m - 1. It then uses modular arithmetic to transform the integer that each plaintext letter corresponds to into another integer that correspond to a ciphertext letter. The encryption function for a single letter is

where modulus m is the size of the alphabet and a and b are the key of the cipher. The value a must be chosen such that a and m are coprime.
Considering the specific case of encrypting messages in English (i.e. m = 26), there are a total of 286 non-trivial affine ciphers, not counting the 26 trivial Caesar ciphers. This number comes from the fact there are 12 numbers that are coprime with 26 that are less than 26 (these are the possible values of a). Each value of a can have 26 different addition shifts (the b value) ; therefore, there are 12*26 or 312 possible keys.
Plaintext: paulb
cipher variations:
qbvmcubjieybxegcblaigbzwkkbnsmsbpkqwbdgs
abrcuebfywibtuymbhqarcwndvckjfzcyfhdcmbj
hcaxllcotntcqlrxcehtbcsdvfcgzxjcuvzncirb
sdxoewdlkgadzgiednckidbymmdpuoudrmsydfiu
cdtewgdhaykdvwaodjscteypfxemlhbeahjfeodl
jecznneqvpvesntzegjvdeufxheibzlewxbpektd
ufzqgyfnmicfbikgfpemkfdaoofrwqwftouafhkw
efvgyifjcamfxycqfluevgarhzgonjdgcjlhgqfn
lgebppgsxrxgupvbgilxfgwhzjgkdbngyzdrgmvf
whbsiahpokehdkmihrgomhfcqqhtysyhvqwchjmy
ghxiakhlecohzaeshnwgxictjbiqplfielnjishp
nigdrriuztziwrxdiknzhiyjblimfdpiabftioxh
yjdukcjrqmgjfmokjtiqojhessjvauajxsyejloa
ijzkcmjngeqjbcgujpyizkevldksrnhkgnplkujr
pkifttkwbvbkytzfkmpbjkaldnkohfrkcdhvkqzj
alfwmeltsoilhoqmlvksqljguulxcwclzuaglnqc
klbmeolpigsldeiwlrakbmgxnfmutpjmiprnmwlt
rmkhvvmydxdmavbhmordlmcnfpmqjhtmefjxmsbl
cnhyognvuqknjqsonxmusnliwwnzeyenbwcinpse
mndogqnrkiunfgkyntcmdoizphowvrlokrtpoynv
tomjxxoafzfocxdjoqtfnoephrosljvoghlzoudn
epjaqipxwsmplsuqpzowupnkyypbgagpdyekprug
opfqisptmkwphimapveofqkbrjqyxtnqmtvrqapx
vqolzzqchbhqezflqsvhpqgrjtqunlxqijnbqwfp
grlcskrzyuornuwsrbqywrpmaardicirfagmrtwi
qrhskurvomyrjkocrxgqhsmdtlsazvpsovxtscrz
xsqnbbsejdjsgbhnsuxjrsitlvswpnzsklpdsyhr
itneumtbawqtpwyutdsaytrocctfkekthciotvyk
stjumwtxqoatlmqetzisjuofvnucbxruqxzvuetb
zuspdduglfluidjpuwzltukvnxuyrpbumnrfuajt
kvpgwovdcysvryawvfucavtqeevhmgmvjekqvxam
uvlwoyvzsqcvnosgvbkulwqhxpwedztwszbxwgvd
bwurffwinhnwkflrwybnvwmxpzwatrdwopthwclv
mxriyqxfeauxtacyxhwecxvsggxjoioxlgmsxzco
wxnyqaxbusexpquixdmwnysjzrygfbvyubdzyixf
dywthhykpjpymhntyadpxyozrbycvtfyqrvjyenx
oztkaszhgcwzvceazjygezxuiizlqkqzniouzbeq
yzpasczdwugzrswkzfoypaulbtaihdxawdfbakzh
fayvjjamrlraojpvacfrzaqbtdaexvhastxlagpz

The decryption function is

where a - 1 is the modular multiplicative inverse of a modulo m. I.e., it satisfies the equation

The multiplicative inverse of a only exists if a and m are coprime. Hence without the restriction on a decryption might not be possible. It can be shown as follows that decryption function is the inverse of the encryption function,

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ROT13 Cipher
Applying ROT13 to a piece of text merely requires examining its alphabetic characters and replacing each one by the letter 13 places further along in the alphabet, wrapping back to the beginning if necessary. A becomes N, B becomes O, and so on up to M, which becomes Z, then the sequence continues at the beginning of the alphabet: N becomes A, O becomes B, and so on to Z, which becomes M. Only those letters which occur in the English alphabet are affected; numbers, symbols, whitespace, and all other characters are left unchanged. Because there are 26 letters in the English alphabet and 26 = 2 * 13, the ROT13 function is its own inverse:

ROT13(ROT13(x)) = x for any basic Latin-alphabet text x


An example plaintext to ciphertext using ROT13:

Plain: paulb
Cipher: cnhyo

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Polybius Square

A Polybius Square is a table that allows someone to translate letters into numbers. To give a small level of encryption, this table can be randomized and shared with the recipient. In order to fit the 26 letters of the alphabet into the 25 spots created by the table, the letters i and j are usually combined.
1 2 3 4 5
1 A B C D E
2 F G H I/J K
3 L M N O P
4 Q R S T U
5 V W X Y Z

Basic Form:
Plain: paulb
Cipher: 5311541321

Extended Methods:
Method #1

Plaintext: paulb
method variations:
ufzqgzlevmeqkarkvpfw

Method #2
Bifid cipher
The message is converted to its coordinates in the usual manner, but they are written vertically beneath:
p a u l b 
5 1 5 1 2 
3 1 4 3 1 
They are then read out in rows:
5151231431
Then divided up into pairs again, and the pairs turned back into letters using the square:
Plain: paulb
Cipher: eemqc

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Method #3

Plaintext: paulb
method variations:
cvdhv vdhvc dhvcv
hvcvd vcvdh

Read more ...[RUS] , [EN]

 

Permutation Cipher
In classical cryptography, a permutation cipher is a transposition cipher in which the key is a permutation. To apply a cipher, a random permutation of size E is generated (the larger the value of E the more secure the cipher). The plaintext is then broken into segments of size E and the letters within that segment are permuted according to this key.
In theory, any transposition cipher can be viewed as a permutation cipher where E is equal to the length of the plaintext; this is too cumbersome a generalisation to use in actual practice, however.
The idea behind a permutation cipher is to keep the plaintext characters unchanged, butalter their positions by rearrangement using a permutation
This cipher is defined as:
Let m be a positive integer, and K consist of all permutations of {1,...,m}
For a key (permutation) , define:
The encryption function
The decryption function
A small example, assuming m = 6, and the key is the permutation :

The first row is the value of i, and the second row is the corresponding value of (i)
The inverse permutation, is constructed by interchanging the two rows, andrearranging the columns so that the first row is in increasing order, Therefore, is:

Total variation formula:

e = 2,718281828 , n - plaintext length

Plaintext: paulb

all 120 cipher variations:
paulb paubl palub palbu pablu pabul pualb puabl pulab pulba publa
pubal pluab pluba plaub plabu plbau plbua pbula pbual pblua pblau
pbalu pbaul apulb apubl aplub aplbu apblu apbul auplb aupbl aulpb
aulbp aublp aubpl alupb alubp alpub alpbu albpu albup abulp abupl
ablup ablpu abplu abpul uaplb uapbl ualpb ualbp uablp uabpl upalb
upabl uplab uplba upbla upbal ulpab ulpba ulapb ulabp ulbap ulbpa
ubpla ubpal ublpa ublap ubalp ubapl laupb laubp lapub lapbu labpu
labup luapb luabp lupab lupba lubpa lubap lpuab lpuba lpaub lpabu
lpbau lpbua lbupa lbuap lbpua lbpau lbapu lbaup baulp baupl balup
balpu baplu bapul bualp buapl bulap bulpa bupla bupal bluap blupa
blaup blapu blpau blpua bpula bpual bplua bplau bpalu bpaul

Read more ...[1] , [2] , [3]

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