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Caesar cipher

Caesar cipher, is one of the simplest and most widely known encryption techniques. The transformation can be represented by aligning two alphabets, the cipher alphabet is the plain alphabet rotated left or right by some number of positions.

When encrypting, a person looks up each letter of the message in the 'plain' line and writes down the corresponding letter in the 'cipher' line. Deciphering is done in reverse.
The encryption can also be represented using modular arithmetic by first transforming the letters into numbers, according to the scheme, A = 0, B = 1,..., Z = 25. Encryption of a letter x by a shift n can be described mathematically as

Plaintext: kubic
cipher variations:
lvcjd mwdke nxelf oyfmg pzgnh
qahoi rbipj scjqk tdkrl uelsm
vfmtn wgnuo xhovp yipwq zjqxr
akrys blszt cmtau dnubv eovcw
fpwdx gqxey hryfz iszga jtahb

Decryption is performed similarly,

(There are different definitions for the modulo operation. In the above, the result is in the range 0...25. I.e., if x+n or x-n are not in the range 0...25, we have to subtract or add 26.)
Read more ...
Atbash Cipher

Atbash is an ancient encryption system created in the Middle East. It was originally used in the Hebrew language.
The Atbash cipher is a simple substitution cipher that relies on transposing all the letters in the alphabet such that the resulting alphabet is backwards.
The first letter is replaced with the last letter, the second with the second-last, and so on.
An example plaintext to ciphertext using Atbash:
Plain: kubic
Cipher: pfyrx

Read more ...

 

Baconian Cipher

To encode a message, each letter of the plaintext is replaced by a group of five of the letters 'A' or 'B'. This replacement is done according to the alphabet of the Baconian cipher, shown below.
a   AAAAA   g    AABBA     m    ABABB   s    BAAAB     y    BABBA
b   AAAAB   h    AABBB     n    ABBAA   t    BAABA     z    BABBB
c   AAABA   i    ABAAA     o    ABBAB   u    BAABB 
d   AAABB   j    BBBAA     p    ABBBA   v    BBBAB
e   AABAA   k    ABAAB     q    ABBBB   w    BABAA
f   AABAB   l    ABABA     r    BAAAA   x    BABAB

Plain: kubic
Cipher: ABAAB BAABB AAAAB ABAAA AAABA

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Affine Cipher
In the affine cipher the letters of an alphabet of size m are first mapped to the integers in the range 0..m - 1. It then uses modular arithmetic to transform the integer that each plaintext letter corresponds to into another integer that correspond to a ciphertext letter. The encryption function for a single letter is

where modulus m is the size of the alphabet and a and b are the key of the cipher. The value a must be chosen such that a and m are coprime.
Considering the specific case of encrypting messages in English (i.e. m = 26), there are a total of 286 non-trivial affine ciphers, not counting the 26 trivial Caesar ciphers. This number comes from the fact there are 12 numbers that are coprime with 26 that are less than 26 (these are the possible values of a). Each value of a can have 26 different addition shifts (the b value) ; therefore, there are 12*26 or 312 possible keys.
Plaintext: kubic
cipher variations:
lvcjdfjezhzxgpltlifpnzkvthnmlxvpqrfpdshj
jruxndfwnrxtydvrhatzmwdkegkfaiayhqmumjgq
oalwuionmywqrsgqetikksvyoegxosyuzewsibua
nxelfhlgbjbzirnvnkhrpbmxvjponzxrsthrfujl
ltwzpfhyptzvafxtjcvboyfmgimhckcajsowolis
qcnywkqpoaystuisgvkmmuxaqgizquawbgyukdwc
pzgnhjnidldbktpxpmjtrdozxlrqpbztuvjthwln
nvybrhjarvbxchzvlexdqahoikojemecluqyqnku
sepaymsrqcauvwkuixmoowzcsikbswcydiawmfye
rbipjlpkfnfdmvrzrolvtfqbzntsrdbvwxlvjynp
pxadtjlctxdzejbxngzfscjqkmqlgogenwsaspmw
ugrcaoutsecwxymwkzoqqybeukmduyeafkcyohag
tdkrlnrmhphfoxtbtqnxvhsdbpvutfdxyznxlapr
rzcfvlnevzfbgldzpibhuelsmosniqigpyucuroy
witecqwvugeyzaoymbqssadgwmofwagchmeaqjci
vfmtnptojrjhqzvdvspzxjufdrxwvhfzabpzncrt
tbehxnpgxbhdinfbrkdjwgnuoqupkskirawewtqa
ykvgesyxwigabcqaodsuucfiyoqhyciejogcslek
xhovprvqltljsbxfxurbzlwhftzyxjhbcdrbpetv
vdgjzprizdjfkphdtmflyipwqswrmumktcygyvsc
amxiguazykicdescqfuwwehkaqsjaekglqieungm
zjqxrtxsnvnludzhzwtdbnyjhvbazljdeftdrgvx
xfilbrtkbflhmrjfvohnakrysuytowomveaiaxue
cozkiwcbamkefgueshwyygjmcsulcgminskgwpio
blsztvzupxpnwfbjbyvfdpaljxdcbnlfghvftixz
zhkndtvmdhnjotlhxqjpcmtauwavqyqoxgckczwg
eqbmkyedcomghiwgujyaailoeuwneiokpumiyrkq
dnubvxbwrzrpyhdldaxhfrcnlzfedpnhijxhvkzb
bjmpfvxofjplqvnjzslreovcwycxsasqziemebyi
gsdomagfeqoijkyiwlaccknqgwypgkqmrwokatms
fpwdxzdytbtrajfnfczjhtepnbhgfrpjklzjxmbd
dlorhxzqhlrnsxplbuntgqxeyaezucusbkgogdak
iufqocihgsqklmakynceempsiyarimsotyqmcvou
hryfzbfavdvtclhphebljvgrpdjihtrlmnblzodf
fnqtjzbsjntpuzrndwpviszgacgbwewudmiqifcm
kwhsqekjiusmnocmapeggorukactkouqvasoexqw
jtahbdhcxfxvenjrjgdnlxitrflkjvtnopdnbqfh
hpsvlbdulpvrwbtpfyrxkubiceidygywfokskheo
myjusgmlkwuopqeocrgiiqtwmcevmqwsxcuqgzsy

The decryption function is

where a - 1 is the modular multiplicative inverse of a modulo m. I.e., it satisfies the equation

The multiplicative inverse of a only exists if a and m are coprime. Hence without the restriction on a decryption might not be possible. It can be shown as follows that decryption function is the inverse of the encryption function,

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ROT13 Cipher
Applying ROT13 to a piece of text merely requires examining its alphabetic characters and replacing each one by the letter 13 places further along in the alphabet, wrapping back to the beginning if necessary. A becomes N, B becomes O, and so on up to M, which becomes Z, then the sequence continues at the beginning of the alphabet: N becomes A, O becomes B, and so on to Z, which becomes M. Only those letters which occur in the English alphabet are affected; numbers, symbols, whitespace, and all other characters are left unchanged. Because there are 26 letters in the English alphabet and 26 = 2 * 13, the ROT13 function is its own inverse:

ROT13(ROT13(x)) = x for any basic Latin-alphabet text x


An example plaintext to ciphertext using ROT13:

Plain: kubic
Cipher: xhovp

Read more ...

 

Polybius Square

A Polybius Square is a table that allows someone to translate letters into numbers. To give a small level of encryption, this table can be randomized and shared with the recipient. In order to fit the 26 letters of the alphabet into the 25 spots created by the table, the letters i and j are usually combined.
1 2 3 4 5
1 A B C D E
2 F G H I/J K
3 L M N O P
4 Q R S T U
5 V W X Y Z

Basic Form:
Plain: kubic
Cipher: 5254214231

Extended Methods:
Method #1

Plaintext: kubic
method variations:
pzgohuemtnzkrysepwdx

Method #2
Bifid cipher
The message is converted to its coordinates in the usual manner, but they are written vertically beneath:
k u b i c 
5 5 2 4 3 
2 4 1 2 1 
They are then read out in rows:
5524324121
Then divided up into pairs again, and the pairs turned back into letters using the square:
Plain: kubic
Cipher: zrhdb

Read more ...
Method #3

Plaintext: kubic
method variations:
wiqmv iqmvw qmvwi
mvwiq vwiqm

Read more ...[RUS] , [EN]

 

Permutation Cipher
In classical cryptography, a permutation cipher is a transposition cipher in which the key is a permutation. To apply a cipher, a random permutation of size E is generated (the larger the value of E the more secure the cipher). The plaintext is then broken into segments of size E and the letters within that segment are permuted according to this key.
In theory, any transposition cipher can be viewed as a permutation cipher where E is equal to the length of the plaintext; this is too cumbersome a generalisation to use in actual practice, however.
The idea behind a permutation cipher is to keep the plaintext characters unchanged, butalter their positions by rearrangement using a permutation
This cipher is defined as:
Let m be a positive integer, and K consist of all permutations of {1,...,m}
For a key (permutation) , define:
The encryption function
The decryption function
A small example, assuming m = 6, and the key is the permutation :

The first row is the value of i, and the second row is the corresponding value of (i)
The inverse permutation, is constructed by interchanging the two rows, andrearranging the columns so that the first row is in increasing order, Therefore, is:

Total variation formula:

e = 2,718281828 , n - plaintext length

Plaintext: kubic

all 120 cipher variations:
kubic kubci kuibc kuicb kucib kucbi kbuic kbuci kbiuc kbicu kbciu
kbcui kibuc kibcu kiubc kiucb kicub kicbu kcbiu kcbui kcibu kciub
kcuib kcubi ukbic ukbci ukibc ukicb ukcib ukcbi ubkic ubkci ubikc
ubick ubcik ubcki uibkc uibck uikbc uikcb uickb uicbk ucbik ucbki
ucibk ucikb uckib uckbi bukic bukci buikc buick bucik bucki bkuic
bkuci bkiuc bkicu bkciu bkcui bikuc bikcu biukc biuck bicuk bicku
bckiu bckui bciku bciuk bcuik bcuki iubkc iubck iukbc iukcb iuckb
iucbk ibukc ibuck ibkuc ibkcu ibcku ibcuk ikbuc ikbcu ikubc ikucb
ikcub ikcbu icbku icbuk ickbu ickub icukb icubk cubik cubki cuibk
cuikb cukib cukbi cbuik cbuki cbiuk cbiku cbkiu cbkui cibuk cibku
ciubk ciukb cikub cikbu ckbiu ckbui ckibu ckiub ckuib ckubi

Read more ...[1] , [2] , [3]

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