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Caesar cipher

Caesar cipher, is one of the simplest and most widely known encryption techniques. The transformation can be represented by aligning two alphabets, the cipher alphabet is the plain alphabet rotated left or right by some number of positions.

When encrypting, a person looks up each letter of the message in the 'plain' line and writes down the corresponding letter in the 'cipher' line. Deciphering is done in reverse.
The encryption can also be represented using modular arithmetic by first transforming the letters into numbers, according to the scheme, A = 0, B = 1,..., Z = 25. Encryption of a letter x by a shift n can be described mathematically as

Plaintext: jetes
cipher variations:
kfuft lgvgu mhwhv nixiw ojyjx
pkzky qlalz rmbma sncnb todoc
upepd vqfqe wrgrf xshsg ytith
zujui avkvj bwlwk cxmxl dynym
ezozn fapao gbqbp hcrcq idsdr

Decryption is performed similarly,

(There are different definitions for the modulo operation. In the above, the result is in the range 0...25. I.e., if x+n or x-n are not in the range 0...25, we have to subtract or add 26.)
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Atbash Cipher

Atbash is an ancient encryption system created in the Middle East. It was originally used in the Hebrew language.
The Atbash cipher is a simple substitution cipher that relies on transposing all the letters in the alphabet such that the resulting alphabet is backwards.
The first letter is replaced with the last letter, the second with the second-last, and so on.
An example plaintext to ciphertext using Atbash:
Plain: jetes
Cipher: qvgvh

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Baconian Cipher

To encode a message, each letter of the plaintext is replaced by a group of five of the letters 'A' or 'B'. This replacement is done according to the alphabet of the Baconian cipher, shown below.
a   AAAAA   g    AABBA     m    ABABB   s    BAAAB     y    BABBA
b   AAAAB   h    AABBB     n    ABBAA   t    BAABA     z    BABBB
c   AAABA   i    ABAAA     o    ABBAB   u    BAABB 
d   AAABB   j    BBBAA     p    ABBBA   v    BBBAB
e   AABAA   k    ABAAB     q    ABBBB   w    BABAA
f   AABAB   l    ABABA     r    BAAAA   x    BABAB

Plain: jetes
Cipher: BBBAA AABAA BAABA AABAA BAAAB

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Affine Cipher
In the affine cipher the letters of an alphabet of size m are first mapped to the integers in the range 0..m - 1. It then uses modular arithmetic to transform the integer that each plaintext letter corresponds to into another integer that correspond to a ciphertext letter. The encryption function for a single letter is

where modulus m is the size of the alphabet and a and b are the key of the cipher. The value a must be chosen such that a and m are coprime.
Considering the specific case of encrypting messages in English (i.e. m = 26), there are a total of 286 non-trivial affine ciphers, not counting the 26 trivial Caesar ciphers. This number comes from the fact there are 12 numbers that are coprime with 26 that are less than 26 (these are the possible values of a). Each value of a can have 26 different addition shifts (the b value) ; therefore, there are 12*26 or 312 possible keys.
Plaintext: jetes
cipher variations:
kfuftcngnduvsvnmdedxelqlhwtctrgjajlyrmrv
qzyzfihkhpapwpzsxixjlgvgudohoevwtwonefey
fmrmixudushkbkmzsnswrazagjiliqbqxqatyjyk
mhwhvepipfwxuxpofgfzgnsnjyvevtilclnatotx
sbabhkjmjrcryrbuzkzlnixiwfqjqgxyvyqpghga
hotokzwfwujmdmobupuytcbcilknksdszscvalam
ojyjxgrkrhyzwzrqhihbipuplaxgxvknenpcvqvz
udcdjmloltetatdwbmbnpkzkyhslsizaxasrijic
jqvqmbyhywlofoqdwrwavedeknmpmufubuexcnco
qlalzitmtjabybtsjkjdkrwrnczizxmpgprexsxb
wfeflonqnvgvcvfydodprmbmajunukbczcutklke
lsxsodajaynqhqsfytycxgfgmporowhwdwgzepeq
sncnbkvovlcdadvulmlfmtytpebkbzorirtgzuzd
yhghnqpspxixexhafqfrtodoclwpwmdebewvmnmg
nuzuqfclcapsjsuhavaezihiorqtqyjyfyibgrgs
upepdmxqxnefcfxwnonhovavrgdmdbqtktvibwbf
ajijpsrurzkzgzjchshtvqfqenyryofgdgyxopoi
pwbwshenecruluwjcxcgbkjkqtsvsalahakditiu
wrgrfozszpghehzypqpjqxcxtifofdsvmvxkdydh
clklrutwtbmbiblejujvxshsgpataqhifiazqrqk
rydyujgpgetwnwylezeidmlmsvuxucncjcmfkvkw
ytithqbubrijgjbarsrlszezvkhqhfuxoxzmfafj
enmntwvyvdodkdnglwlxzujuircvcsjkhkcbstsm
tafawlirigvypyangbgkfonouxwzwepeleohmxmy
avkvjsdwdtklildctutnubgbxmjsjhwzqzbohchl
gpopvyxaxfqfmfpinynzbwlwktexeulmjmeduvuo
vchcynktkixaracpidimhqpqwzybygrgngqjozoa
cxmxlufyfvmnknfevwvpwdidzoluljybsbdqjejn
irqrxazczhshohrkpapbdynymvgzgwnologfwxwq
xejeapmvmkzctcerkfkojsrsybadaitipislqbqc
ezoznwhahxopmphgxyxryfkfbqnwnladudfslglp
ktstzcbebjujqjtmrcrdfapaoxibiypqnqihyzys
zglgcroxombevegtmhmqlutuadcfckvkrkunsdse
gbqbpyjcjzqrorjizaztahmhdspypncfwfhuninr
mvuvbedgdlwlslvotetfhcrcqzkdkarspskjabau
binietqzqodgxgivojosnwvwcfehemxmtmwpufug
idsdralelbstqtlkbcbvcjojfurarpehyhjwpkpt
oxwxdgfifnynunxqvgvhjetesbmfmcturumlcdcw
dkpkgvsbsqfizikxqlqupyxyehgjgozovoyrwhwi

The decryption function is

where a - 1 is the modular multiplicative inverse of a modulo m. I.e., it satisfies the equation

The multiplicative inverse of a only exists if a and m are coprime. Hence without the restriction on a decryption might not be possible. It can be shown as follows that decryption function is the inverse of the encryption function,

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ROT13 Cipher
Applying ROT13 to a piece of text merely requires examining its alphabetic characters and replacing each one by the letter 13 places further along in the alphabet, wrapping back to the beginning if necessary. A becomes N, B becomes O, and so on up to M, which becomes Z, then the sequence continues at the beginning of the alphabet: N becomes A, O becomes B, and so on to Z, which becomes M. Only those letters which occur in the English alphabet are affected; numbers, symbols, whitespace, and all other characters are left unchanged. Because there are 26 letters in the English alphabet and 26 = 2 * 13, the ROT13 function is its own inverse:

ROT13(ROT13(x)) = x for any basic Latin-alphabet text x


An example plaintext to ciphertext using ROT13:

Plain: jetes
Cipher: wrgrf

Read more ...

 

Polybius Square

A Polybius Square is a table that allows someone to translate letters into numbers. To give a small level of encryption, this table can be randomized and shared with the recipient. In order to fit the 26 letters of the alphabet into the 25 spots created by the table, the letters i and j are usually combined.
1 2 3 4 5
1 A B C D E
2 F G H I/J K
3 L M N O P
4 Q R S T U
5 V W X Y Z

Basic Form:
Plain: jetes
Cipher: 4251445134

Extended Methods:
Method #1

Plaintext: jetes
method variations:
okykxtpdpcyuiuhdzozn

Method #2
Bifid cipher
The message is converted to its coordinates in the usual manner, but they are written vertically beneath:
j e t e s 
4 5 4 5 3 
2 1 4 1 4 
They are then read out in rows:
4545321414
Then divided up into pairs again, and the pairs turned back into letters using the square:
Plain: jetes
Cipher: yyhqq

Read more ...
Method #3

Plaintext: jetes
method variations:
wqylt qyltw yltwq
ltwqy twqyl

Read more ...[RUS] , [EN]

 

Permutation Cipher
In classical cryptography, a permutation cipher is a transposition cipher in which the key is a permutation. To apply a cipher, a random permutation of size E is generated (the larger the value of E the more secure the cipher). The plaintext is then broken into segments of size E and the letters within that segment are permuted according to this key.
In theory, any transposition cipher can be viewed as a permutation cipher where E is equal to the length of the plaintext; this is too cumbersome a generalisation to use in actual practice, however.
The idea behind a permutation cipher is to keep the plaintext characters unchanged, butalter their positions by rearrangement using a permutation
This cipher is defined as:
Let m be a positive integer, and K consist of all permutations of {1,...,m}
For a key (permutation) , define:
The encryption function
The decryption function
A small example, assuming m = 6, and the key is the permutation :

The first row is the value of i, and the second row is the corresponding value of (i)
The inverse permutation, is constructed by interchanging the two rows, andrearranging the columns so that the first row is in increasing order, Therefore, is:

Total variation formula:

e = 2,718281828 , n - plaintext length

Plaintext: jetes

all 120 cipher variations:
jetes jetse jeets jeest jeset jeste jtees jtese jtees jtese jtsee
jtsee jetes jetse jeets jeest jeset jeste jstee jstee jsete jseet
jseet jsete ejtes ejtse ejets ejest ejset ejste etjes etjse etejs
etesj etsej etsje eetjs eetsj eejts eejst eesjt eestj estej estje
esetj esejt esjet esjte tejes tejse teejs teesj tesej tesje tjees
tjese tjees tjese tjsee tjsee tejes tejse teejs teesj tesej tesje
tsjee tsjee tseje tseej tseej tseje eetjs eetsj eejts eejst eesjt
eestj etejs etesj etjes etjse etsje etsej ejtes ejtse ejets ejest
ejset ejste estje estej esjte esjet esejt esetj setej setje seetj
seejt sejet sejte steej steje steej steje stjee stjee setej setje
seetj seejt sejet sejte sjtee sjtee sjete sjeet sjeet sjete

Read more ...[1] , [2] , [3]

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