easy ciphers

Easy Ciphers Tools:
cryptography lectures
popular ciphers:

heliographic

bilinigrin

peditem

gorenflos

mcziel

hyalinocrystalline

chronogrammatically

northpembroke

rickd

birdlime

bedsonias

tessmer

stoll

exconjugant

chipewyan

houstoun

hemitypic

megalith


Caesar cipher

Caesar cipher, is one of the simplest and most widely known encryption techniques. The transformation can be represented by aligning two alphabets, the cipher alphabet is the plain alphabet rotated left or right by some number of positions.

When encrypting, a person looks up each letter of the message in the 'plain' line and writes down the corresponding letter in the 'cipher' line. Deciphering is done in reverse.
The encryption can also be represented using modular arithmetic by first transforming the letters into numbers, according to the scheme, A = 0, B = 1,..., Z = 25. Encryption of a letter x by a shift n can be described mathematically as

Plaintext: exuit
cipher variations:
fyvju gzwkv haxlw ibymx jczny
kdaoz lebpa mfcqb ngdrc ohesd
pifte qjguf rkhvg sliwh tmjxi
unkyj volzk wpmal xqnbm yrocn
zspdo atqep burfq cvsgr dwths

Decryption is performed similarly,

(There are different definitions for the modulo operation. In the above, the result is in the range 0...25. I.e., if x+n or x-n are not in the range 0...25, we have to subtract or add 26.)
Read more ...
Atbash Cipher

Atbash is an ancient encryption system created in the Middle East. It was originally used in the Hebrew language.
The Atbash cipher is a simple substitution cipher that relies on transposing all the letters in the alphabet such that the resulting alphabet is backwards.
The first letter is replaced with the last letter, the second with the second-last, and so on.
An example plaintext to ciphertext using Atbash:
Plain: exuit
Cipher: vcfrg

Read more ...

 

Baconian Cipher

To encode a message, each letter of the plaintext is replaced by a group of five of the letters 'A' or 'B'. This replacement is done according to the alphabet of the Baconian cipher, shown below.
a   AAAAA   g    AABBA     m    ABABB   s    BAAAB     y    BABBA
b   AAAAB   h    AABBB     n    ABBAA   t    BAABA     z    BABBB
c   AAABA   i    ABAAA     o    ABBAB   u    BAABB 
d   AAABB   j    BBBAA     p    ABBBA   v    BBBAB
e   AABAA   k    ABAAB     q    ABBBB   w    BABAA
f   AABAB   l    ABABA     r    BAAAA   x    BABAB

Plain: exuit
Cipher: AABAA BABAB BAABB ABAAA BAABA

Read more ...

 

Affine Cipher
In the affine cipher the letters of an alphabet of size m are first mapped to the integers in the range 0..m - 1. It then uses modular arithmetic to transform the integer that each plaintext letter corresponds to into another integer that correspond to a ciphertext letter. The encryption function for a single letter is

where modulus m is the size of the alphabet and a and b are the key of the cipher. The value a must be chosen such that a and m are coprime.
Considering the specific case of encrypting messages in English (i.e. m = 26), there are a total of 286 non-trivial affine ciphers, not counting the 26 trivial Caesar ciphers. This number comes from the fact there are 12 numbers that are coprime with 26 that are less than 26 (these are the possible values of a). Each value of a can have 26 different addition shifts (the b value) ; therefore, there are 12*26 or 312 possible keys.
Plaintext: exuit
cipher variations:
fyvjunsjzgvmxpsdglfelazvqtunlcjiprarcdhm
zwrxyhqfnkpktdwxehtigzwkvotkahwnyqtehmgf
mbawruvomdkjqsbsdeinaxsyzirgolqluexyfiuj
haxlwpulbixozrufinhgncbxsvwpnelkrtctefjo
bytzajshpmrmvfyzgjvkibymxqvmcjypasvgjoih
odcytwxqofmlsudufgkpczuabktiqnsnwgzahkwl
jcznyrwndkzqbtwhkpjipedzuxyrpgnmtvevghlq
davbclujrotoxhabilxmkdaozsxoelarcuxilqkj
qfeavyzsqhonuwfwhimrebwcdmvkspupyibcjmyn
lebpatypfmbsdvyjmrlkrgfbwzatripovxgxijns
fcxdenwltqvqzjcdknzomfcqbuzqgnctewzknsml
shgcxabusjqpwyhyjkotgdyefoxmurwrakdeloap
ngdrcvarhodufxalotnmtihdybcvtkrqxzizklpu
hezfgpynvsxsblefmpbqohesdwbsipevgybmpuon
ujiezcdwulsryajalmqvifaghqzowtytcmfgnqcr
piftexctjqfwhzcnqvpovkjfadexvmtszbkbmnrw
jgbhirapxuzudnghordsqjgufydukrgxiadorwqp
wlkgbefywnutaclcnosxkhcijsbqyvaveohipset
rkhvgzevlshyjbepsxrqxmlhcfgzxovubdmdopty
lidjktcrzwbwfpijqtfusliwhafwmtizkcfqtysr
ynmidghaypwvcenepquzmjekludsaxcxgqjkrugv
tmjxibgxnujaldgruztszonjehibzqxwdfofqrva
nkflmvetbydyhrklsvhwunkyjchyovkbmehsvaut
apokfijcaryxegpgrswbolgmnwfuczezislmtwix
volzkdizpwlcnfitwbvubqplgjkdbszyfhqhstxc
pmhnoxgvdafajtmnuxjywpmalejaqxmdogjuxcwv
crqmhklectazgirituydqniopyhwebgbkunovykz
xqnbmfkbrynephkvydxwdsrnilmfdubahjsjuvze
rojpqzixfchclvopwzlayrocnglcszofqilwzeyx
etsojmngevcbiktkvwafspkqrajygdidmwpqxamb
zspdohmdtapgrjmxafzyfutpknohfwdcjlulwxbg
tqlrsbkzhejenxqrybncatqepineubqhsknybgaz
gvuqlopigxedkmvmxychurmstclaifkfoyrszcod
burfqjofvcritlozchbahwvrmpqjhyfelnwnyzdi
vsntudmbjglgpzstadpecvsgrkpgwdsjumpadicb
ixwsnqrkizgfmoxozaejwtouvenckhmhqatubeqf
dwthslqhxetkvnqbejdcjyxtorsljahgnpypabfk
xupvwfodlinirbuvcfrgexuitmriyfulworcfked
kzyupstmkbihoqzqbcglyvqwxgpemjojscvwdgsh

The decryption function is

where a - 1 is the modular multiplicative inverse of a modulo m. I.e., it satisfies the equation

The multiplicative inverse of a only exists if a and m are coprime. Hence without the restriction on a decryption might not be possible. It can be shown as follows that decryption function is the inverse of the encryption function,

Read more ...

 

ROT13 Cipher
Applying ROT13 to a piece of text merely requires examining its alphabetic characters and replacing each one by the letter 13 places further along in the alphabet, wrapping back to the beginning if necessary. A becomes N, B becomes O, and so on up to M, which becomes Z, then the sequence continues at the beginning of the alphabet: N becomes A, O becomes B, and so on to Z, which becomes M. Only those letters which occur in the English alphabet are affected; numbers, symbols, whitespace, and all other characters are left unchanged. Because there are 26 letters in the English alphabet and 26 = 2 * 13, the ROT13 function is its own inverse:

ROT13(ROT13(x)) = x for any basic Latin-alphabet text x


An example plaintext to ciphertext using ROT13:

Plain: exuit
Cipher: rkhvg

Read more ...

 

Polybius Square

A Polybius Square is a table that allows someone to translate letters into numbers. To give a small level of encryption, this table can be randomized and shared with the recipient. In order to fit the 26 letters of the alphabet into the 25 spots created by the table, the letters i and j are usually combined.
1 2 3 4 5
1 A B C D E
2 F G H I/J K
3 L M N O P
4 Q R S T U
5 V W X Y Z

Basic Form:
Plain: exuit
Cipher: 5135544244

Extended Methods:
Method #1

Plaintext: exuit
method variations:
kczoyphetdunkyizspdo

Method #2
Bifid cipher
The message is converted to its coordinates in the usual manner, but they are written vertically beneath:
e x u i t 
5 3 5 4 4 
1 5 4 2 4 
They are then read out in rows:
5354415424
Then divided up into pairs again, and the pairs turned back into letters using the square:
Plain: exuit
Cipher: pudur

Read more ...
Method #3

Plaintext: exuit
method variations:
lztry ztryl trylz
rylzt ylztr

Read more ...[RUS] , [EN]

 

Permutation Cipher
In classical cryptography, a permutation cipher is a transposition cipher in which the key is a permutation. To apply a cipher, a random permutation of size E is generated (the larger the value of E the more secure the cipher). The plaintext is then broken into segments of size E and the letters within that segment are permuted according to this key.
In theory, any transposition cipher can be viewed as a permutation cipher where E is equal to the length of the plaintext; this is too cumbersome a generalisation to use in actual practice, however.
The idea behind a permutation cipher is to keep the plaintext characters unchanged, butalter their positions by rearrangement using a permutation
This cipher is defined as:
Let m be a positive integer, and K consist of all permutations of {1,...,m}
For a key (permutation) , define:
The encryption function
The decryption function
A small example, assuming m = 6, and the key is the permutation :

The first row is the value of i, and the second row is the corresponding value of (i)
The inverse permutation, is constructed by interchanging the two rows, andrearranging the columns so that the first row is in increasing order, Therefore, is:

Total variation formula:

e = 2,718281828 , n - plaintext length

Plaintext: exuit

all 120 cipher variations:
exuit exuti exiut exitu extiu extui euxit euxti euixt euitx eutix
eutxi eiuxt eiutx eixut eixtu eitxu eitux etuix etuxi etiux etixu
etxiu etxui xeuit xeuti xeiut xeitu xetiu xetui xueit xueti xuiet
xuite xutie xutei xiuet xiute xieut xietu xiteu xitue xtuie xtuei
xtiue xtieu xteiu xteui uxeit uxeti uxiet uxite uxtie uxtei uexit
uexti ueixt ueitx uetix uetxi uiext uietx uixet uixte uitxe uitex
uteix utexi utiex utixe utxie utxei ixuet ixute ixeut ixetu ixteu
ixtue iuxet iuxte iuext iuetx iutex iutxe ieuxt ieutx iexut iextu
ietxu ietux ituex ituxe iteux itexu itxeu itxue txuie txuei txiue
txieu txeiu txeui tuxie tuxei tuixe tuiex tueix tuexi tiuxe tiuex
tixue tixeu tiexu tieux teuix teuxi teiux teixu texiu texui

Read more ...[1] , [2] , [3]

History of cryptography
2011 Easy Ciphers. All rights reserved. contact us