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Caesar cipher

Caesar cipher, is one of the simplest and most widely known encryption techniques. The transformation can be represented by aligning two alphabets, the cipher alphabet is the plain alphabet rotated left or right by some number of positions.

When encrypting, a person looks up each letter of the message in the 'plain' line and writes down the corresponding letter in the 'cipher' line. Deciphering is done in reverse.
The encryption can also be represented using modular arithmetic by first transforming the letters into numbers, according to the scheme, A = 0, B = 1,..., Z = 25. Encryption of a letter x by a shift n can be described mathematically as

Plaintext: coaxy
cipher variations:
dpbyz eqcza frdab gsebc htfcd
iugde jvhef kwifg lxjgh mykhi
nzlij oamjk pbnkl qcolm rdpmn
seqno tfrop ugspq vhtqr wiurs
xjvst ykwtu zlxuv amyvw bnzwx

Decryption is performed similarly,

(There are different definitions for the modulo operation. In the above, the result is in the range 0...25. I.e., if x+n or x-n are not in the range 0...25, we have to subtract or add 26.)
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Atbash Cipher

Atbash is an ancient encryption system created in the Middle East. It was originally used in the Hebrew language.
The Atbash cipher is a simple substitution cipher that relies on transposing all the letters in the alphabet such that the resulting alphabet is backwards.
The first letter is replaced with the last letter, the second with the second-last, and so on.
An example plaintext to ciphertext using Atbash:
Plain: coaxy
Cipher: xlzcb

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Baconian Cipher

To encode a message, each letter of the plaintext is replaced by a group of five of the letters 'A' or 'B'. This replacement is done according to the alphabet of the Baconian cipher, shown below.
a   AAAAA   g    AABBA     m    ABABB   s    BAAAB     y    BABBA
b   AAAAB   h    AABBB     n    ABBAA   t    BAABA     z    BABBB
c   AAABA   i    ABAAA     o    ABBAB   u    BAABB 
d   AAABB   j    BBBAA     p    ABBBA   v    BBBAB
e   AABAA   k    ABAAB     q    ABBBB   w    BABAA
f   AABAB   l    ABABA     r    BAAAA   x    BABAB

Plain: coaxy
Cipher: AAABA ABBAB AAAAA BABAB BABBA

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Affine Cipher
In the affine cipher the letters of an alphabet of size m are first mapped to the integers in the range 0..m - 1. It then uses modular arithmetic to transform the integer that each plaintext letter corresponds to into another integer that correspond to a ciphertext letter. The encryption function for a single letter is

where modulus m is the size of the alphabet and a and b are the key of the cipher. The value a must be chosen such that a and m are coprime.
Considering the specific case of encrypting messages in English (i.e. m = 26), there are a total of 286 non-trivial affine ciphers, not counting the 26 trivial Caesar ciphers. This number comes from the fact there are 12 numbers that are coprime with 26 that are less than 26 (these are the possible values of a). Each value of a can have 26 different addition shifts (the b value) ; therefore, there are 12*26 or 312 possible keys.
Plaintext: coaxy
cipher variations:
dpbyzhrbsvltbmrpvbgntxbajxzbuffdbixjfbct
nhbwprjbqlvlbkhznbedeqczaisctwmucnsqwcho
uycbkyacvggecjykgcduoicxqskcrmwmcliaocfe
frdabjtduxnvdotrxdipvzdclzbdwhhfdkzlhdev
pjdyrtldsnxndmjbpdgfgsebckuevyowepusyejq
waedmacexiigelamiefwqkezsumetoyoenkcqehg
htfcdlvfwzpxfqvtzfkrxbfenbdfyjjhfmbnjfgx
rlfatvnfupzpfoldrfihiugdemwgxaqygrwuagls
ycgfocegzkkigncokghysmgbuwogvqaqgpmesgji
jvhefnxhybrzhsxvbhmtzdhgpdfhalljhodplhiz
tnhcvxphwrbrhqnfthkjkwifgoyizcsaitywcinu
aeihqegibmmkipeqmijauoidwyqixscsiroguilk
lxjghpzjadtbjuzxdjovbfjirfhjcnnljqfrnjkb
vpjexzrjytdtjsphvjmlmykhiqakbeuckvayekpw
cgkjsgikdoomkrgsoklcwqkfyaskzueuktqiwknm
nzlijrblcfvdlwbzflqxdhlkthjleppnlshtplmd
xrlgzbtlavfvlurjxlonoamjkscmdgwemxcagmry
eimluikmfqqomtiuqmneysmhacumbwgwmvskympo
pbnkltdnehxfnydbhnszfjnmvjlngrrpnujvrnof
ztnibdvncxhxnwtlznqpqcolmueofiygozeciota
gkonwkmohssqovkwsopgauojcewodyiyoxumaorq
rdpmnvfpgjzhpafdjpubhlpoxlnpittrpwlxtpqh
bvpkdfxpezjzpyvnbpsrseqnowgqhkaiqbgekqvc
imqpymoqjuusqxmyuqricwqlegyqfakaqzwocqts
tfropxhrilbjrchflrwdjnrqznprkvvtrynzvrsj
dxrmfhzrgblbraxpdrutugspqyisjmcksdigmsxe
kosraoqslwwuszoawstkeysngiashcmcsbyqesvu
vhtqrzjtkndltejhntyflptsbprtmxxvtapbxtul
fztohjbtidndtczrftwvwiursakuloemufkiouzg
mqutcqsunyywubqcyuvmgaupikcujeoeudasguxw
xjvstblvmpfnvgljpvahnrvudrtvozzxvcrdzvwn
hbvqjldvkfpfvebthvyxykwtucmwnqgowhmkqwbi
oswvesuwpaaywdseawxoicwrkmewlgqgwfcuiwzy
zlxuvdnxorhpxinlrxcjptxwftvxqbbzxetfbxyp
jdxslnfxmhrhxgdvjxazamyvweoypsiqyjomsydk
quyxguwyrccayfugcyzqkeytmogynisiyhewkyba
bnzwxfpzqtjrzkpntzelrvzyhvxzsddbzgvhdzar
lfzunphzojtjzifxlzcbcoaxygqaruksalqouafm
swaziwyateecahwieabsmgavoqiapkukajgymadc

The decryption function is

where a - 1 is the modular multiplicative inverse of a modulo m. I.e., it satisfies the equation

The multiplicative inverse of a only exists if a and m are coprime. Hence without the restriction on a decryption might not be possible. It can be shown as follows that decryption function is the inverse of the encryption function,

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ROT13 Cipher
Applying ROT13 to a piece of text merely requires examining its alphabetic characters and replacing each one by the letter 13 places further along in the alphabet, wrapping back to the beginning if necessary. A becomes N, B becomes O, and so on up to M, which becomes Z, then the sequence continues at the beginning of the alphabet: N becomes A, O becomes B, and so on to Z, which becomes M. Only those letters which occur in the English alphabet are affected; numbers, symbols, whitespace, and all other characters are left unchanged. Because there are 26 letters in the English alphabet and 26 = 2 * 13, the ROT13 function is its own inverse:

ROT13(ROT13(x)) = x for any basic Latin-alphabet text x


An example plaintext to ciphertext using ROT13:

Plain: coaxy
Cipher: pbnkl

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Polybius Square

A Polybius Square is a table that allows someone to translate letters into numbers. To give a small level of encryption, this table can be randomized and shared with the recipient. In order to fit the 26 letters of the alphabet into the 25 spots created by the table, the letters i and j are usually combined.
1 2 3 4 5
1 A B C D E
2 F G H I/J K
3 L M N O P
4 Q R S T U
5 V W X Y Z

Basic Form:
Plain: coaxy
Cipher: 3143113545

Extended Methods:
Method #1

Plaintext: coaxy
method variations:
htfcdnylhisdqnoxivst

Method #2
Bifid cipher
The message is converted to its coordinates in the usual manner, but they are written vertically beneath:
c o a x y 
3 4 1 3 4 
1 3 1 5 5 
They are then read out in rows:
3413413155
Then divided up into pairs again, and the pairs turned back into letters using the square:
Plain: coaxy
Cipher: sldcz

Read more ...
Method #3

Plaintext: coaxy
method variations:
qclup clupq lupqc
upqcl pqclu

Read more ...[RUS] , [EN]

 

Permutation Cipher
In classical cryptography, a permutation cipher is a transposition cipher in which the key is a permutation. To apply a cipher, a random permutation of size E is generated (the larger the value of E the more secure the cipher). The plaintext is then broken into segments of size E and the letters within that segment are permuted according to this key.
In theory, any transposition cipher can be viewed as a permutation cipher where E is equal to the length of the plaintext; this is too cumbersome a generalisation to use in actual practice, however.
The idea behind a permutation cipher is to keep the plaintext characters unchanged, butalter their positions by rearrangement using a permutation
This cipher is defined as:
Let m be a positive integer, and K consist of all permutations of {1,...,m}
For a key (permutation) , define:
The encryption function
The decryption function
A small example, assuming m = 6, and the key is the permutation :

The first row is the value of i, and the second row is the corresponding value of (i)
The inverse permutation, is constructed by interchanging the two rows, andrearranging the columns so that the first row is in increasing order, Therefore, is:

Total variation formula:

e = 2,718281828 , n - plaintext length

Plaintext: coaxy

all 120 cipher variations:
coaxy coayx coxay coxya coyxa coyax caoxy caoyx caxoy caxyo cayxo
cayox cxaoy cxayo cxoay cxoya cxyoa cxyao cyaxo cyaox cyxao cyxoa
cyoxa cyoax ocaxy ocayx ocxay ocxya ocyxa ocyax oacxy oacyx oaxcy
oaxyc oayxc oaycx oxacy oxayc oxcay oxcya oxyca oxyac oyaxc oyacx
oyxac oyxca oycxa oycax aocxy aocyx aoxcy aoxyc aoyxc aoycx acoxy
acoyx acxoy acxyo acyxo acyox axcoy axcyo axocy axoyc axyoc axyco
aycxo aycox ayxco ayxoc ayoxc ayocx xoacy xoayc xocay xocya xoyca
xoyac xaocy xaoyc xacoy xacyo xayco xayoc xcaoy xcayo xcoay xcoya
xcyoa xcyao xyaco xyaoc xycao xycoa xyoca xyoac yoaxc yoacx yoxac
yoxca yocxa yocax yaoxc yaocx yaxoc yaxco yacxo yacox yxaoc yxaco
yxoac yxoca yxcoa yxcao ycaxo ycaox ycxao ycxoa ycoxa ycoax

Read more ...[1] , [2] , [3]

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