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holycross

legionarii

vanquish

winterish

crypteroniaceae

unsolidifiable

capetia

darys

latosa

frothsome

compellabas

exspectarent

vasso

myrmecophaga

daribah

genesial

rowlet

uicimusque


Caesar cipher

Caesar cipher, is one of the simplest and most widely known encryption techniques. The transformation can be represented by aligning two alphabets, the cipher alphabet is the plain alphabet rotated left or right by some number of positions.

When encrypting, a person looks up each letter of the message in the 'plain' line and writes down the corresponding letter in the 'cipher' line. Deciphering is done in reverse.
The encryption can also be represented using modular arithmetic by first transforming the letters into numbers, according to the scheme, A = 0, B = 1,..., Z = 25. Encryption of a letter x by a shift n can be described mathematically as

Plaintext: bugle
cipher variations:
cvhmf dwing exjoh fykpi gzlqj
hamrk ibnsl jcotm kdpun leqvo
mfrwp ngsxq ohtyr piuzs qjvat
rkwbu slxcv tmydw unzex voafy
wpbgz xqcha yrdib zsejc atfkd

Decryption is performed similarly,

(There are different definitions for the modulo operation. In the above, the result is in the range 0...25. I.e., if x+n or x-n are not in the range 0...25, we have to subtract or add 26.)
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Atbash Cipher

Atbash is an ancient encryption system created in the Middle East. It was originally used in the Hebrew language.
The Atbash cipher is a simple substitution cipher that relies on transposing all the letters in the alphabet such that the resulting alphabet is backwards.
The first letter is replaced with the last letter, the second with the second-last, and so on.
An example plaintext to ciphertext using Atbash:
Plain: bugle
Cipher: yftov

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Baconian Cipher

To encode a message, each letter of the plaintext is replaced by a group of five of the letters 'A' or 'B'. This replacement is done according to the alphabet of the Baconian cipher, shown below.
a   AAAAA   g    AABBA     m    ABABB   s    BAAAB     y    BABBA
b   AAAAB   h    AABBB     n    ABBAA   t    BAABA     z    BABBB
c   AAABA   i    ABAAA     o    ABBAB   u    BAABB 
d   AAABB   j    BBBAA     p    ABBBA   v    BBBAB
e   AABAA   k    ABAAB     q    ABBBB   w    BABAA
f   AABAB   l    ABABA     r    BAAAA   x    BABAB

Plain: bugle
Cipher: AAAAB BAABB AABBA ABABA AABAA

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Affine Cipher
In the affine cipher the letters of an alphabet of size m are first mapped to the integers in the range 0..m - 1. It then uses modular arithmetic to transform the integer that each plaintext letter corresponds to into another integer that correspond to a ciphertext letter. The encryption function for a single letter is

where modulus m is the size of the alphabet and a and b are the key of the cipher. The value a must be chosen such that a and m are coprime.
Considering the specific case of encrypting messages in English (i.e. m = 26), there are a total of 286 non-trivial affine ciphers, not counting the 26 trivial Caesar ciphers. This number comes from the fact there are 12 numbers that are coprime with 26 that are less than 26 (these are the possible values of a). Each value of a can have 26 different addition shifts (the b value) ; therefore, there are 12*26 or 312 possible keys.
Plaintext: bugle
cipher variations:
cvhmfejtingxfevilradkzdwlmnpstqpnkjsdzgr
urlczwfxyhytjupahvqxdwingfkujohygfwjmsbe
laexmnoqturqolkteahsvsmdaxgyzizukvqbiwry
exjohglvkpizhgxkntcfmbfynopruvsrpmlufbit
wtnebyhzajavlwrcjxszfykpihmwlqjaihyloudg
ncgzopqsvwtsqnmvgcjuxuofcziabkbwmxsdkyta
gzlqjinxmrkbjizmpvehodhapqrtwxutronwhdkv
yvpgdajbclcxnytelzubhamrkjoynslckjanqwfi
peibqrsuxyvuspoxielwzwqhebkcdmdyozufmavc
ibnslkpzotmdlkborxgjqfjcrstvyzwvtqpyjfmx
axrifcldenezpavgnbwdjcotmlqapunemlcpsyhk
rgkdstuwzaxwurqzkgnybysjgdmefofaqbwhocxe
kdpunmrbqvofnmdqtzilshletuvxabyxvsralhoz
cztkhenfgpgbrcxipdyfleqvonscrwpgoneruajm
timfuvwybczywtsbmipadaulifoghqhcsdyjqezg
mfrwpotdsxqhpofsvbknujngvwxzcdazxutcnjqb
ebvmjgphiridtezkrfahngsxqpuetyriqpgtwclo
vkohwxyadebayvudokrcfcwnkhqijsjeufalsgbi
ohtyrqvfuzsjrqhuxdmpwlpixyzbefcbzwveplsd
gdxolirjktkfvgbmthcjpiuzsrwgvatksrivyenq
xmqjyzacfgdcaxwfqmteheypmjsklulgwhcnuidk
qjvatsxhwbultsjwzforynrkzabdghedbyxgrnuf
ifzqnktlmvmhxidovjelrkwbutyixcvmutkxagps
zoslabcehifeczyhsovgjgarolumnwniyjepwkfm
slxcvuzjydwnvulybhqtaptmbcdfijgfdazitpwh
khbspmvnoxojzkfqxlgntmydwvakzexowvmzciru
bquncdegjkhgebajuqxilictqnwopypkalgrymho
unzexwblafypxwnadjsvcrvodefhklihfcbkvryj
mjduroxpqzqlbmhsznipvoafyxcmbgzqyxobektw
dswpefgilmjigdclwszknkevspyqrarmcnitaojq
wpbgzydncharzypcfluxetxqfghjmnkjhedmxtal
olfwtqzrsbsndojubpkrxqchazeodibsazqdgmvy
fuyrghiknolkifenyubmpmgxurastctoepkvcqls
yrdibafpejctbarehnwzgvzshijlopmljgfozvcn
qnhyvsbtudupfqlwdrmtzsejcbgqfkducbsfioxa
hwatijkmpqnmkhgpawdoroizwtcuvevqgrmxesnu
atfkdchrglevdctgjpybixbujklnqronlihqbxep
spjaxudvwfwrhsnyftovbugledishmfweduhkqzc
jycvklmorspomjircyfqtqkbyvewxgxsitozgupw

The decryption function is

where a - 1 is the modular multiplicative inverse of a modulo m. I.e., it satisfies the equation

The multiplicative inverse of a only exists if a and m are coprime. Hence without the restriction on a decryption might not be possible. It can be shown as follows that decryption function is the inverse of the encryption function,

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ROT13 Cipher
Applying ROT13 to a piece of text merely requires examining its alphabetic characters and replacing each one by the letter 13 places further along in the alphabet, wrapping back to the beginning if necessary. A becomes N, B becomes O, and so on up to M, which becomes Z, then the sequence continues at the beginning of the alphabet: N becomes A, O becomes B, and so on to Z, which becomes M. Only those letters which occur in the English alphabet are affected; numbers, symbols, whitespace, and all other characters are left unchanged. Because there are 26 letters in the English alphabet and 26 = 2 * 13, the ROT13 function is its own inverse:

ROT13(ROT13(x)) = x for any basic Latin-alphabet text x


An example plaintext to ciphertext using ROT13:

Plain: bugle
Cipher: ohtyr

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Polybius Square

A Polybius Square is a table that allows someone to translate letters into numbers. To give a small level of encryption, this table can be randomized and shared with the recipient. In order to fit the 26 letters of the alphabet into the 25 spots created by the table, the letters i and j are usually combined.
1 2 3 4 5
1 A B C D E
2 F G H I/J K
3 L M N O P
4 Q R S T U
5 V W X Y Z

Basic Form:
Plain: bugle
Cipher: 2154221351

Extended Methods:
Method #1

Plaintext: bugle
method variations:
gzmqkmervprkwauwpbfz

Method #2
Bifid cipher
The message is converted to its coordinates in the usual manner, but they are written vertically beneath:
b u g l e 
2 5 2 1 5 
1 4 2 3 1 
They are then read out in rows:
2521514231
Then divided up into pairs again, and the pairs turned back into letters using the square:
Plain: bugle
Cipher: wbeic

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Method #3

Plaintext: bugle
method variations:
vibxf ibxfv bxfvi
xfvib fvibx

Read more ...[RUS] , [EN]

 

Permutation Cipher
In classical cryptography, a permutation cipher is a transposition cipher in which the key is a permutation. To apply a cipher, a random permutation of size E is generated (the larger the value of E the more secure the cipher). The plaintext is then broken into segments of size E and the letters within that segment are permuted according to this key.
In theory, any transposition cipher can be viewed as a permutation cipher where E is equal to the length of the plaintext; this is too cumbersome a generalisation to use in actual practice, however.
The idea behind a permutation cipher is to keep the plaintext characters unchanged, butalter their positions by rearrangement using a permutation
This cipher is defined as:
Let m be a positive integer, and K consist of all permutations of {1,...,m}
For a key (permutation) , define:
The encryption function
The decryption function
A small example, assuming m = 6, and the key is the permutation :

The first row is the value of i, and the second row is the corresponding value of (i)
The inverse permutation, is constructed by interchanging the two rows, andrearranging the columns so that the first row is in increasing order, Therefore, is:

Total variation formula:

e = 2,718281828 , n - plaintext length

Plaintext: bugle

all 120 cipher variations:
bugle bugel bulge buleg buelg buegl bgule bguel bglue bgleu bgelu
bgeul blgue blgeu bluge blueg bleug blegu beglu begul belgu belug
beulg beugl ubgle ubgel ublge ubleg ubelg ubegl ugble ugbel uglbe
ugleb ugelb ugebl ulgbe ulgeb ulbge ulbeg ulebg ulegb ueglb uegbl
uelgb uelbg ueblg uebgl guble gubel gulbe guleb guelb guebl gbule
gbuel gblue gbleu gbelu gbeul glbue glbeu glube glueb gleub glebu
geblu gebul gelbu gelub geulb geubl lugbe lugeb lubge lubeg luebg
luegb lgube lgueb lgbue lgbeu lgebu lgeub lbgue lbgeu lbuge lbueg
lbeug lbegu legbu legub lebgu lebug leubg leugb euglb eugbl eulgb
eulbg eublg eubgl egulb egubl eglub eglbu egblu egbul elgub elgbu
elugb elubg elbug elbgu ebglu ebgul eblgu eblug ebulg ebugl

Read more ...[1] , [2] , [3]

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