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Caesar cipher

Caesar cipher, is one of the simplest and most widely known encryption techniques. The transformation can be represented by aligning two alphabets, the cipher alphabet is the plain alphabet rotated left or right by some number of positions.

When encrypting, a person looks up each letter of the message in the 'plain' line and writes down the corresponding letter in the 'cipher' line. Deciphering is done in reverse.
The encryption can also be represented using modular arithmetic by first transforming the letters into numbers, according to the scheme, A = 0, B = 1,..., Z = 25. Encryption of a letter x by a shift n can be described mathematically as

Plaintext: becket
cipher variations:
cfdlfu dgemgv ehfnhw figoix gjhpjy
hkiqkz iljrla jmksmb knltnc lomuod
mpnvpe nqowqf orpxrg psqysh qtrzti
rusauj svtbvk twucwl uxvdxm vyweyn
wzxfzo xaygap ybzhbq zcaicr adbjds

Decryption is performed similarly,

(There are different definitions for the modulo operation. In the above, the result is in the range 0...25. I.e., if x+n or x-n are not in the range 0...25, we have to subtract or add 26.)
Read more ...
Atbash Cipher

Atbash is an ancient encryption system created in the Middle East. It was originally used in the Hebrew language.
The Atbash cipher is a simple substitution cipher that relies on transposing all the letters in the alphabet such that the resulting alphabet is backwards.
The first letter is replaced with the last letter, the second with the second-last, and so on.
An example plaintext to ciphertext using Atbash:
Plain: becket
Cipher: yvxpvg

Read more ...

 

Baconian Cipher

To encode a message, each letter of the plaintext is replaced by a group of five of the letters 'A' or 'B'. This replacement is done according to the alphabet of the Baconian cipher, shown below.
a   AAAAA   g    AABBA     m    ABABB   s    BAAAB     y    BABBA
b   AAAAB   h    AABBB     n    ABBAA   t    BAABA     z    BABBB
c   AAABA   i    ABAAA     o    ABBAB   u    BAABB 
d   AAABB   j    BBBAA     p    ABBBA   v    BBBAB
e   AABAA   k    ABAAB     q    ABBBB   w    BABAA
f   AABAB   l    ABABA     r    BAAAA   x    BABAB

Plain: becket
Cipher: AAAAB AABAA AAABA ABAAB AABAA BAABA

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Affine Cipher
In the affine cipher the letters of an alphabet of size m are first mapped to the integers in the range 0..m - 1. It then uses modular arithmetic to transform the integer that each plaintext letter corresponds to into another integer that correspond to a ciphertext letter. The encryption function for a single letter is

where modulus m is the size of the alphabet and a and b are the key of the cipher. The value a must be chosen such that a and m are coprime.
Considering the specific case of encrypting messages in English (i.e. m = 26), there are a total of 286 non-trivial affine ciphers, not counting the 26 trivial Caesar ciphers. This number comes from the fact there are 12 numbers that are coprime with 26 that are less than 26 (these are the possible values of a). Each value of a can have 26 different addition shifts (the b value) ; therefore, there are 12*26 or 312 possible keys.
Plaintext: becket
cipher variations:
cfdlfuenhfnggvlzvsidptdekltnlqmtxhtcqjfvjasrjprm
uznjzywhrdhkypvxpwaxzrxidgemgvfoigohhwmawtjequef
lmuomrnuyiudrkgwkbtskqsnvaokazxiseilzqwyqxbyasyj
ehfnhwgpjhpiixnbxukfrvfgmnvpnsovzjveslhxlcutlrto
wbplbayjtfjmarxzryczbtzkfigoixhqkiqjjyocyvlgswgh
nowqotpwakwftmiymdvumsupxcqmcbzkugknbsyaszdacual
gjhpjyirljrkkzpdzwmhtxhiopxrpuqxblxgunjznewvntvq
ydrndcalvhloctzbtaebdvbmhkiqkzjsmksllaqeaxniuyij
pqysqvrycmyhvokaofxwouwrzesoedbmwimpduacubfcewcn
iljrlaktnltmmbrfbyojvzjkqrztrwszdnziwplbpgyxpvxs
aftpfecnxjnqevbdvcgdfxdojmksmbluomunncsgczpkwakl
rsausxtaeoajxqmcqhzyqwytbguqgfdoykorfwcewdhegyep
knltncmvpnvoodthdaqlxblmstbvtyubfpbkyrndriazrxzu
chvrhgepzlpsgxdfxeifhzfqlomuodnwqowppeuiebrmycmn
tucwuzvcgqclzsoesjbasyavdiwsihfqamqthyegyfjgiagr
mpnvpeoxrpxqqfvjfcsnzdnouvdxvawdhrdmatpftkcbtzbw
ejxtjigrbnruizfhzgkhjbhsnqowqfpysqyrrgwkgdtoaeop
vweywbxeisenbuqguldcuacxfkyukjhscosvjagiahlikcit
orpxrgqztrzsshxlheupbfpqwxfzxcyfjtfocvrhvmedvbdy
glzvlkitdptwkbhjbimjldjupsqyshrausattiymifvqcgqr
xygaydzgkugpdwsiwnfewcezhmawmljuequxlcikcjnkmekv
qtrztisbvtbuujznjgwrdhrsyzhbzeahlvhqextjxogfxdfa
inbxnmkvfrvymdjldkolnflwrusaujtcwucvvkaokhxseist
zaicafbimwirfyukyphgyegbjocyonlwgswznekmelpmogmx
svtbvkudxvdwwlbpliytfjtuabjdbgcjnxjsgzvlzqihzfhc
kpdzpomxhtxaoflnfmqnphnytwucwlveywexxmcqmjzugkuv
bckechdkoykthawmarjiagidlqeaqpnyiuybpgmognroqioz
uxvdxmwfzxfyyndrnkavhlvwcdlfdielpzluibxnbskjbhje
mrfbrqozjvzcqhnphosprjpavyweynxgaygzzoesolbwimwx
demgejfmqamvjcyoctlkcikfnsgcsrpakwadrioqiptqskqb
wzxfzoyhbzhaapftpmcxjnxyefnhfkgnrbnwkdzpdumldjlg
othdtsqblxbesjprjqurtlrcxaygapzicaibbqguqndykoyz
fgoiglhoscoxleaqevnmekmhpuieutrcmycftkqskrvsumsd
ybzhbqajdbjccrhvroezlpzaghpjhmiptdpymfbrfwonflni
qvjfvusdnzdgulrtlswtvntezcaicrbkeckddsiwspfamqab
hiqkinjqueqzngcsgxpogmojrwkgwvteoaehvmsumtxuwouf
adbjdsclfdleetjxtqgbnrbcijrljokrvfraohdthyqphnpk
sxlhxwufpbfiwntvnuyvxpvgbecketdmgemffukyurhcoscd
jksmkplswgsbpieuizrqioqltymiyxvgqcgjxouwovzwyqwh

The decryption function is

where a - 1 is the modular multiplicative inverse of a modulo m. I.e., it satisfies the equation

The multiplicative inverse of a only exists if a and m are coprime. Hence without the restriction on a decryption might not be possible. It can be shown as follows that decryption function is the inverse of the encryption function,

Read more ...

 

ROT13 Cipher
Applying ROT13 to a piece of text merely requires examining its alphabetic characters and replacing each one by the letter 13 places further along in the alphabet, wrapping back to the beginning if necessary. A becomes N, B becomes O, and so on up to M, which becomes Z, then the sequence continues at the beginning of the alphabet: N becomes A, O becomes B, and so on to Z, which becomes M. Only those letters which occur in the English alphabet are affected; numbers, symbols, whitespace, and all other characters are left unchanged. Because there are 26 letters in the English alphabet and 26 = 2 * 13, the ROT13 function is its own inverse:

ROT13(ROT13(x)) = x for any basic Latin-alphabet text x


An example plaintext to ciphertext using ROT13:

Plain: becket
Cipher: orpxrg

Read more ...

 

Polybius Square

A Polybius Square is a table that allows someone to translate letters into numbers. To give a small level of encryption, this table can be randomized and shared with the recipient. In order to fit the 26 letters of the alphabet into the 25 spots created by the table, the letters i and j are usually combined.
1 2 3 4 5
1 A B C D E
2 F G H I/J K
3 L M N O P
4 Q R S T U
5 V W X Y Z

Basic Form:
Plain: becket
Cipher: 215131525144

Extended Methods:
Method #1

Plaintext: becket
method variations:
gkhpkympnupdruszuiwzxezo

Method #2
Bifid cipher
The message is converted to its coordinates in the usual manner, but they are written vertically beneath:
b e c k e t 
2 5 3 5 5 4 
1 1 1 2 1 4 
They are then read out in rows:
253554111214
Then divided up into pairs again, and the pairs turned back into letters using the square:
Plain: becket
Cipher: wxuafq

Read more ...
Method #3

Plaintext: becket
method variations:
vlvwqi lvwqiv vwqivl
wqivlv qivlvw ivlvwq

Read more ...[RUS] , [EN]

 

Permutation Cipher
In classical cryptography, a permutation cipher is a transposition cipher in which the key is a permutation. To apply a cipher, a random permutation of size E is generated (the larger the value of E the more secure the cipher). The plaintext is then broken into segments of size E and the letters within that segment are permuted according to this key.
In theory, any transposition cipher can be viewed as a permutation cipher where E is equal to the length of the plaintext; this is too cumbersome a generalisation to use in actual practice, however.
The idea behind a permutation cipher is to keep the plaintext characters unchanged, butalter their positions by rearrangement using a permutation
This cipher is defined as:
Let m be a positive integer, and K consist of all permutations of {1,...,m}
For a key (permutation) , define:
The encryption function
The decryption function
A small example, assuming m = 6, and the key is the permutation :

The first row is the value of i, and the second row is the corresponding value of (i)
The inverse permutation, is constructed by interchanging the two rows, andrearranging the columns so that the first row is in increasing order, Therefore, is:

Total variation formula:

e = 2,718281828 , n - plaintext length

Plaintext: becket

all 720 cipher variations:
becket beckte becekt becetk bectek bectke bekcet bekcte bekect beketc bektec
bektce beekct beektc beeckt beectk beetck beetkc betkec betkce betekc beteck
betcek betcke bceket bcekte bceekt bceetk bcetek bcetke bckeet bckete bckeet
bckete bcktee bcktee bceket bcekte bceekt bceetk bcetek bcetke bctkee bctkee
bcteke bcteek bcteek bcteke bkceet bkcete bkceet bkcete bkctee bkctee bkecet
bkecte bkeect bkeetc bketec bketce bkeect bkeetc bkecet bkecte bketce bketec
bkteec bktece bkteec bktece bktcee bktcee becket beckte becekt becetk bectek
bectke bekcet bekcte bekect beketc bektec bektce beekct beektc beeckt beectk
beetck beetkc betkec betkce betekc beteck betcek betcke btckee btckee btceke
btceek btceek btceke btkcee btkcee btkece btkeec btkeec btkece btekce btekec
btecke btecek bteeck bteekc btekec btekce bteekc bteeck btecek btecke ebcket
ebckte ebcekt ebcetk ebctek ebctke ebkcet ebkcte ebkect ebketc ebktec ebktce
ebekct ebektc ebeckt ebectk ebetck ebetkc ebtkec ebtkce ebtekc ebteck ebtcek
ebtcke ecbket ecbkte ecbekt ecbetk ecbtek ecbtke eckbet eckbte eckebt ecketb
eckteb ecktbe ecekbt ecektb ecebkt ecebtk ecetbk ecetkb ectkeb ectkbe ectekb
ectebk ectbek ectbke ekcbet ekcbte ekcebt ekcetb ekcteb ekctbe ekbcet ekbcte
ekbect ekbetc ekbtec ekbtce ekebct ekebtc ekecbt ekectb eketcb eketbc ektbec
ektbce ektebc ektecb ektceb ektcbe eeckbt eecktb eecbkt eecbtk eectbk eectkb
eekcbt eekctb eekbct eekbtc eektbc eektcb eebkct eebktc eebckt eebctk eebtck
eebtkc eetkbc eetkcb eetbkc eetbck eetcbk eetckb etckeb etckbe etcekb etcebk
etcbek etcbke etkceb etkcbe etkecb etkebc etkbec etkbce etekcb etekbc eteckb
etecbk etebck etebkc etbkec etbkce etbekc etbeck etbcek etbcke cebket cebkte
cebekt cebetk cebtek cebtke cekbet cekbte cekebt ceketb cekteb cektbe ceekbt
ceektb ceebkt ceebtk ceetbk ceetkb cetkeb cetkbe cetekb cetebk cetbek cetbke
cbeket cbekte cbeekt cbeetk cbetek cbetke cbkeet cbkete cbkeet cbkete cbktee
cbktee cbeket cbekte cbeekt cbeetk cbetek cbetke cbtkee cbtkee cbteke cbteek
cbteek cbteke ckbeet ckbete ckbeet ckbete ckbtee ckbtee ckebet ckebte ckeebt
ckeetb cketeb cketbe ckeebt ckeetb ckebet ckebte cketbe cketeb ckteeb cktebe
ckteeb cktebe cktbee cktbee cebket cebkte cebekt cebetk cebtek cebtke cekbet
cekbte cekebt ceketb cekteb cektbe ceekbt ceektb ceebkt ceebtk ceetbk ceetkb
cetkeb cetkbe cetekb cetebk cetbek cetbke ctbkee ctbkee ctbeke ctbeek ctbeek
ctbeke ctkbee ctkbee ctkebe ctkeeb ctkeeb ctkebe ctekbe ctekeb ctebke ctebek
cteebk cteekb ctekeb ctekbe cteekb cteebk ctebek ctebke kecbet kecbte kecebt
kecetb kecteb kectbe kebcet kebcte kebect kebetc kebtec kebtce keebct keebtc
keecbt keectb keetcb keetbc ketbec ketbce ketebc ketecb ketceb ketcbe kcebet
kcebte kceebt kceetb kceteb kcetbe kcbeet kcbete kcbeet kcbete kcbtee kcbtee
kcebet kcebte kceebt kceetb kceteb kcetbe kctbee kctbee kctebe kcteeb kcteeb
kctebe kbceet kbcete kbceet kbcete kbctee kbctee kbecet kbecte kbeect kbeetc
kbetec kbetce kbeect kbeetc kbecet kbecte kbetce kbetec kbteec kbtece kbteec
kbtece kbtcee kbtcee kecbet kecbte kecebt kecetb kecteb kectbe kebcet kebcte
kebect kebetc kebtec kebtce keebct keebtc keecbt keectb keetcb keetbc ketbec
ketbce ketebc ketecb ketceb ketcbe ktcbee ktcbee ktcebe ktceeb ktceeb ktcebe
ktbcee ktbcee ktbece ktbeec ktbeec ktbece ktebce ktebec ktecbe kteceb kteecb
kteebc ktebec ktebce kteebc kteecb kteceb ktecbe eeckbt eecktb eecbkt eecbtk
eectbk eectkb eekcbt eekctb eekbct eekbtc eektbc eektcb eebkct eebktc eebckt
eebctk eebtck eebtkc eetkbc eetkcb eetbkc eetbck eetcbk eetckb ecekbt ecektb
ecebkt ecebtk ecetbk ecetkb eckebt ecketb eckbet eckbte ecktbe eckteb ecbket
ecbkte ecbekt ecbetk ecbtek ecbtke ectkbe ectkeb ectbke ectbek ectebk ectekb
ekcebt ekcetb ekcbet ekcbte ekctbe ekcteb ekecbt ekectb ekebct ekebtc eketbc
eketcb ekbect ekbetc ekbcet ekbcte ekbtce ekbtec ektebc ektecb ektbec ektbce
ektcbe ektceb ebcket ebckte ebcekt ebcetk ebctek ebctke ebkcet ebkcte ebkect
ebketc ebktec ebktce ebekct ebektc ebeckt ebectk ebetck ebetkc ebtkec ebtkce
ebtekc ebteck ebtcek ebtcke etckbe etckeb etcbke etcbek etcebk etcekb etkcbe
etkceb etkbce etkbec etkebc etkecb etbkce etbkec etbcke etbcek etbeck etbekc
etekbc etekcb etebkc etebck etecbk eteckb teckeb teckbe tecekb tecebk tecbek
tecbke tekceb tekcbe tekecb tekebc tekbec tekbce teekcb teekbc teeckb teecbk
teebck teebkc tebkec tebkce tebekc tebeck tebcek tebcke tcekeb tcekbe tceekb
tceebk tcebek tcebke tckeeb tckebe tckeeb tckebe tckbee tckbee tcekeb tcekbe
tceekb tceebk tcebek tcebke tcbkee tcbkee tcbeke tcbeek tcbeek tcbeke tkceeb
tkcebe tkceeb tkcebe tkcbee tkcbee tkeceb tkecbe tkeecb tkeebc tkebec tkebce
tkeecb tkeebc tkeceb tkecbe tkebce tkebec tkbeec tkbece tkbeec tkbece tkbcee
tkbcee teckeb teckbe tecekb tecebk tecbek tecbke tekceb tekcbe tekecb tekebc
tekbec tekbce teekcb teekbc teeckb teecbk teebck teebkc tebkec tebkce tebekc
tebeck tebcek tebcke tbckee tbckee tbceke tbceek tbceek tbceke tbkcee tbkcee
tbkece tbkeec tbkeec tbkece tbekce tbekec tbecke tbecek tbeeck tbeekc tbekec
tbekce tbeekc tbeeck tbecek tbecke

Read more ...[1] , [2] , [3]

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